Zbarazh

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Zbarazh

 

a city (since 1939) and administrative center of Zbarazh Raion, Ternopol’ Oblast, Ukrainian SSR, on the Gnezna River (Dnestr basin). Railroad station on the Ternopol’- Shepetovka line. It is the site of a packaging combine, a factory producing cast objects for household use (for example, ventilators), a sugar refinery, and a wine and must distillery.

References in periodicals archive ?
Zbaraz (126) reads: "The judgment below is affirmed by an equally divided Court." These opinions do not decide any issue in these cases, let alone whether Roe v.
Zbaraz (1980), que reconheceu a constitucionalidade de uma lei do Estado de Illinois, que proibia a assistencia medica a qualquer aborto, salvo aqueles necessarios para salvar a vida da gestante.
Luty, Con, Where have they gone?: a story of Zbaraz and New Valley, Manitoba (Kanata: BelCon Pub.
He settles uneasily in the town of Zbaraz, which is then occupied by the Russians.
As far as the particular details are concerned, there is an obvious progression from the apparent harmlessness of his first arrest at the hands of the local police sergeant in Munich, via the hardship of his flight through central Europe, to the sheer horror of life in Zbaraz. To cite just a few of the awful events the narrator experiences in the ghetto: he is beaten with a steel bar for the sake of a few possessions; he witnesses Ukrainian children gleefully destroying the Jewish cemetery; he tears out the bridgework in his own mouth, since it is made of gold and he can use it to bribe those who might betray him.
The story of this journey, recounted at some length, is one of hardship and danger, and she emerges as a saintly figure, the very antithesis of the brutality and selfishness that characterize life in Zbaraz: 'Der Mut und die Treue einer Frau zerstoren das Lugenhaus des Rassenhasses' (p.
The first edition was, moreover, presented as if it had been written by the survivor of the ghetto in Zbaraz: it was Aufzeichnungen aus einem Erdloch by Jakob Littner.
In Canada, Ukrainians named only a small number of settlements but those they did name have transferred toponyms, e.g., Boian, Halicz, Jaroslaw, Komarno, Senkiw, Terebowla, Ukraina, and Zbaraz, or secular names such as Myrnam, Sirko, Seech, Zelena, Zhoda, and Zoria (Rudnyc'kyj 1970).
52, 73-75 (1976) (invalidating Missouri's one-parent consent requirement); Zbaraz v.
at 639-49 (involving a consent requirement); Zbaraz, 763 F.2d at 1534-35 (involving a notification requirement).
(421) See Zbaraz, 763 F.2d at 1535-36 (involving a 24-hour waiting period after notification).