Zeami


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Zeami

, Seami
Motokiyo . 1363--1443, Japanese dramatist, regarded as the greatest figure in the history of No drama
References in periodicals archive ?
Whatever Fenollosa may have done in the way of awakening his Japanese friends to the need of more active preservation of Japanese values must be set against the spark lit here by his unedited manuscripts." (44) Among Pounds incomplete editions of Fenollosa's translations is Ashikari, by Zeami Motokiyo, a play of Confucian background celebrating the bond of marriage.
Se origina en el Sarugaku y en el Siglo XIV y el Siglo XV Kannami y su hijo Zeami lo perfeccionaron y No llego a tener la forma actual.
Si encontraremos referencias a los instauradores del Noh, Kannami y Zeami, padre e hijo respectivamente, y a algunas de sus obras.
When discussing the question of energy, Barba draws on the theories of Chinese kung-fu, Louis Jouvet, Decroux, Pina Bausch, Zeami, Meyerhold, Balinese dance, etc., to explain the workings of energy.
The main structuring device of No, what Monica Bethe and Karen Brazell term "the basic aesthetic principle underlying the No" (Bethe and Brazell 1978, 6), is the Jo-Ha-Kyu pattern, a pattern that the chief artist of No drama, Zeami Motokiyo, found frequently occurring in nature (1974, 191).
De esta forma, el autor denomina la poetica occidental como "mimetic", derivando tal nocion de la Poetica de Aristoteles, y la oriental como "affective-expressive", proponiendo esta principalmente a partir de la poetica originativa de Zeami (1364-1443).
Other playwrights represented include Sophocles, Shakespeare, Ibsen, Tennessee Williams, and Zeami Motokiyo.
''It is all about concentration,'' Japanese classical author Zeami, known as Kanze Motokiyo, used to say about theater, back in the 15th century.
The Tempest, arguably set in the Mediterranean or the New World at the time of burgeoning Western colonialism, is relocated on the island of Sado, where Zeami, the founder of the Noh theatre, was exiled in the fifteenth century.
Zeami (1363?-1444), who crystallized no into the form we see today, rewrote an old play that was based on The Tale of Genji and called it Aoi No Uye (Goff 1991: 125).
Segun Zeami, el gran teorico en la tradicion japonesa del teatro noo, el hana (la flor) posee diferentes cualidades que corresponden a los cambios que el actor sufre a lo largo de su carrera.
She is the author of ''The Artistry of Aeschylus and Zeami: A Comparative Study of Greek Tragedy and No'' (Princeton University Press, 1989), which was translated into Japanese by Akiko Kiso and published by Osaka University Press.