Zeitgeber


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Zeitgeber

[′tsīt‚gā·bər]
(physiology)
A periodic environmental condition or event that acts to set or reset an innate biological rhythm of an organism.
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Aschoff, himself, coined the term zeitgeber [46], which is now ubiquitously used in the circadian literature to describe an entraining agent or time cue.
Melatonin functions as an important zeitgeber, and melatonin has sleepiness-promoting properties.
For circadian rhythms in larval release, the light-dark cycle serves as the zeitgeber (e.g., Forward et ai, 1982; Ziegler and Forward, 2005, 2006).
Humans can be entrained to a 23.5hour cycle up to a 24.65-hour cycle.1 Zeitgebers enhance the regularity of the endogenously created circadian rhythm.
The main characteristic of a zeitgeber is that it can alter the direction of circadian rhythms, depending on the time of day.
Environmental light, considered a zeitgeber or primary cue for setting the internal clock and maintaining normal day/night rhythms (Mistlberger & Rusak, 2005), may have a dramatic effect on sleep.
Bright light is the strongest "zeitgeber"--a cue responsible for the entrainment (synchronization) of the circadian clock.
(1988) ont tente de relier les modeles biologiques et psychosociaux de la depression, et formule l'hypothese que des signaux sociaux specifiques mobilisent les rythmes circadiens (Zeitgeber) et d'autres vont plutot les perturber (Zeitstorer).
Moreover, the laboratory photoperiod, which is the most important Zeitgeber for many organisms (including arthropods, see Aschoff 1960), reproduced the same seasonal variation observed in nature from winter to summer.
It may be this pathway which allows light to be a strong zeitgeber (an external cue that entrains one's circadian rhythm).
Nearly 20 years ago, she and her colleagues described what they termed the "social zeitgeber" hypothesis of mood disorders.