watt

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watt

[for James WattWatt, James,
1736–1819, Scottish inventor. While working at the Univ. of Glasgow as an instrument maker, Watt was asked to repair a model of Thomas Newcomen's steam engine.
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], abbr. W, unit of power, or work done per unit time, equal to 1 joule per second. It is used as a measure of electrical and mechanical power. One watt is the amount of power that is delivered to a component of an electric circuit when a current of 1 ampere flows through the component and a voltage of 1 volt exists across it. The derivative units are kilowatt (1,000 W; kW) and megawatt (1,000,000 W; MW), used in electric power systems, and milliwatt (0.001 W; mW) and microwatt (0.000001 W; μW), used in electronics.

watt

(wot) Symbol: W. The SI unit of power, defined as the power resulting from the dissipation of one joule of energy in one second.

watt

[wät]
(physics)
The unit of power in the meter-kilogram-second system of units, equal to 1 joule per second. Symbolized W.

watt

A unit of power; the power required to do work at the rate of 1 joule per second, which is equal to the power dissipated in an electric circuit in which a potential difference of 1 volt causes a current of 1 ampere to flow.

watt

the derived SI unit of power, equal to 1 joule per second; the power dissipated by a current of 1 ampere flowing across a potential difference of 1 volt. 1 watt is equivalent to 1.341 × 10--3 horsepower.

Watt

James. 1736--1819, Scottish engineer and inventor. His fundamental improvements to the steam engine led to the widespread use of steam power in industry

watt

The standard unit of measurement of electrical power. One watt is one ampere of current flowing at one volt. Watts are typically rated as AMPS x VOLTS or VOLT-AMP (V-A). However, this rating is only equivalent to watts when it applies to devices that absorb all the energy, such as electric heating coils or incandescent light bulbs. With computer power supplies, the actual watt rating is only 60% to 70% of the VOLT-AMP rating.