Zeuxis


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Zeuxis

(zo͞ok`sĭs), fl. 5th cent. B.C., Greek painter. According to tradition he settled in Ephesus, was an intimate (possibly a pupil) of Apollodorus, and aided in developing a technique for painting light and shadow. Although none of his paintings survives, they are known through ancient writings. Pliny speaks of his competing with Parrhasius for realistic illusion.

Zeuxis

 

an ancient Greek painter who lived from the end of the fifth to the beginning of the fourth century B.C.

Zeuxis worked in various cities in Greece and Italy. He was one of the first to use shading, striving toward illusionistic representation. His works, including Helen, The Centaur Family, and The Infant Heracles Strangling the Serpents, are known from classical literary sources and from later copies of them in Roman wall paintings (House of Vettii in Pompeii) and mosaics (Hadrian’s Villa in Tivoli, near Rome).

REFERENCE

Lepik-Kopaczynska, W. “Zeuxis aus HeraklQa.” Helikon, 1961, vol. 1, pp. 379–426.

Zeuxis

Greek artist (420–390 B.C.) so skilled that birds reputedly flew to his painting of a bunch of grapes. [Gk. Art: EB (1963)]

Zeuxis

late 5th century bc, Greek painter, noted for the verisimilitude of his works
References in periodicals archive ?
Bajo el pseudonimo de Zeuxis, colabora con sus dibujos en la revista, realizando algunas portadas, dibujos caricaturescos de tipos humanos (35), o relatos mudos formados por vinetas, como el titulado El vigor de la parra (36).
This depiction of the philosopher as emulating the violent centaur is curious when taken in consideration of the actual centaurs, found in his Zeuxis. Here, the hybrid animal is shown in the context of an idyllic and civilised family unit, a stark contrast to their philosopher counterparts.
(71) Segun Jenofonte parece que ni siquiera Zeuxis se habia planteado la posibilidad de retar a los dioses con su arte para materializar el alma.
Even when the bulky pulchritude of statuary is at odds with such a visionary conception of beauty, Coleridge speaks of it as a beau ideal which, in the celebrated manner of Zeuxis painting Helen's divine beauty, has abstracted from distortion by selecting only the fairest parts of nature.
Parece-me tambem claro que tal trecho localiza nao mais uma Helena mitico-literaria, mas aquela a que chamei ha pouco de Helena picta ou ficta produzida por Zeuxis, comentada por Cicero e por Dionisio de Halicarnasso (65), ja que la ficava claro que a imitacao de Helena so e possivel no ambito da arte (da [phrase omitted], da imitatio), pois ninguem seria capaz de superar terrenamente sua beleza.
(14) Diu pingo, quia aeternitati pingo, de se Zeuxis aiebat, rogatus cur tam diu haereret in imaginibus.
Derived from Pliny's story of Zeuxis and Parrhasius, two artists competing to see who was more skilled at creating the illusion of reality, the curtain was a mechanism by which the painter deliberately drew attention to their own skill and to the artifice of art.
###Nassarius (Zeuxis) fredericA (Melvill and Standen,###-###2###-###4###-###-###-###-###-###-
V a.C, Zeuxis derrotaba a Parrasio al conseguir enganarlo con su ilusion trompe l'oeil, haciendole descorrer una cortina pintada tan magistralmente que parecia real, en Collage de la banera no.
Pues las tragedias de la mayor parte de los poetas modernos carecen de caracteres, y, por lo general, poetas de esa especie hay muchos, como ocurre entre los pintores con Zeuxis en relacion con Polignoto.
According to Pliny the Elder, the great Greek painter Zeuxis, born in Heraclea in southern Italy in the latter 5th century BC, for example, is said to have painted a bunch of grapes so realistic that a flock of birds flew down to eat them but could only peck at the canvas.
La anecdota en cuestion es un agon estetico protagonizado por Zeuxis y Parrasio, dos artistas de la Grecia clasica que compiten entre si para demostrar la superioridad de sus respectivas obras.