Zigzag

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Zigzag

A line formed by angles that alternately project and retreat; occurring in bands, on columns, and in larger patterns on cornices.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

zigzag, dancette

An ornamental molding of continued chevrons.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
camera to tackle parking outside the city's camera will drive by "hot-spots" and the number vehicles illegally, double lines or zig-zag scrutiny on , services Paul said: "This which is expected to operation in the coming will act like a "drive-by" The device will number plates parked illegally the council more clamp the Cllr the He ANPR schools school This will allow us to cover more schools more effectively, albeit we cannot be everywhere all the time Paul Bowman
He said the EPD "has requested TEVTA [Technical Education and Vocational Training Authority] and other departments for the initiation of technical programmes for the training of skilled labour."He called the conversion of 213 out of total 10,300 kilns into zig-zag technology a big achievement".
"Two drivers were spoken with today and advised regarding zig-zag lines and the potential of a PS50 fine should they need speaking to again."
to achieve the task and convert them into Zig-zag brick kiln.
Liam Davies was segregated from other pupils at Bangor's Ysgol Friars after he turned up for classes with "zig-zags" shaved into his hair.
The book ends with another synthesizing effort, Jeremy Carette's "Growing Up Zig-Zag: Reassessing the Transatlantic Legacy of William James," which uses as a touch point an example of James' own memorably curious nomenclature: how "growing up zig-zag" between the United States and Europe led him to feel "broken" and permanently displaced.
THE first drivers in Cardiff have been fined for parking on zig-zag lines.
But they are not as eager as the woman warden who pounced as Chris stopped for 30 SECONDS on a zig-zag line.
'His feet were big enough to squish her, his trunk almost long enough to catch her.' In the zig-zag pursuit, the woolly mammoth gets snagged on the tower of a toy castle, and starts to unravel, getting smaller and smaller, so that 'Stomp, Stump, Stompety Stomp' becomes 'Pitterpat-pitter', and he's cute and cuddly instead of scary (though he never was that scary, really).