ziggurat

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Related to Ziggurats: Mesopotamia

ziggurat

(zĭg`o͝orăt), form of temple common to the Sumerians, Babylonians and Assyrians. The earliest examples date from the end of the 3d millenium B.C., the latest from the 6th cent. B.C. The ziggurat was a pyramidal structure, built in receding tiers upon a rectangular, oval, or square platform, with a shrine at the summit. The core of the ziggurat was of sun-baked bricks, and the facings were of fired bricks, often glazed in different colors, which are thought to have had cosmological significance. Access to the summit shrine was provided by a series of ramps on one side or by a continuous spiral ramp from base to summit. The number of tiers ranged from two to seven. Notable examples are the ruins at Ur and Khorsabad in Mesopotamia. Similar structures were built by the Mayan people of Central America.

Ziggurat

A Mesopotamian temple having the form of a terraced pyramid rising in three to seven successively receding stages in height; built of mud brick, featuring an outside staircase and a shrine at the top.

Ziggurat

 

(Akkadian), a cultic structure in ancient Mesopotamia. It was a sun-dried brick tower formed from stepped parallelepipeds or truncated pyramids (from three to seven); these contained no internal chambers except for the uppermost, which contained a shrine. The ziggurat’s terraces, which were painted in different colors (mainly black, red, and white), were connected by stairways or ramps. The walls were divided by rectangular recesses. A temple was usually located next to the ziggurat. Ziggurats have been preserved in Iraq (in the ancient cities of Borsippa, Babylon, and Dur-Sharrukin; all dating from the first millennium B.C.) and Iran (at the site of Choga Zambil, second millennium B.C.).

ziggurat

A Mesopotamian temple tower; from the end of the 3rd millennium B.C. on, ziggurats rose in three to seven stages, diminishing in area and often in height square (Sumer) or rectangular (Assyria), built of mud brick and faced with baked brick laid in bitumen.

ziggurat

, zikkurat, zikurat
a type of rectangular temple tower or tiered mound erected by the Sumerians, Akkadians, and Babylonians in Mesopotamia. The tower of Babel is thought to be one of these
References in periodicals archive ?
The architecture employed in the ziggurat is said to resemble those of Egyptian pyramids and Mayan temples.
Next month this time, the Americans, having elected a new president, would know the name of the man who would then be directed towards that ziggurat ascending which would take four years.AaAa
Students preparing for the Mathematics (Calculus course) and Extension One (Advanced Calculus course) will benefit from investigating sigma notation for each of the layers in the solids in ziggurats as part of the Sequences and Series topic.
3500 B.C.: The Sumerians settle along the Euphrates and begin to build ziggurats (temples).
Even though the meaning the Bible asserts for the city's name is incorrect, surviving relics of ziggurats provided a physical foundation for the tale.
Schmid's first two chapters survey the history of knowledge and research concerning the ziggurat, beginning with a brief examination of the traditions and legends that survived in ancient non-Mesopotamian sources and ending with the German excavations on the ziggurat in 1913, the publication of the Esagila Tablet and the various reconstructions and controversies that these two events engendered.
The Tower of Babel looked like the ziggurat, a temple tower of the Babylonians.
NYT Syndicate Suppose that a ramp leading to the top of a ziggurat wall is 56 cubits long, and the vertical height of the ziggurat is 45 cubits.
1696, 2013, a ziggurat of rolls of toilet paper "erected ...
A case in point is the seven heavens and the seven stages of the ziggurat alluded to by Annus here (pp.