zine

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Related to Zines: sleep paralysis, e-zines

zine

(1) See e-zine.

(2) (magaZINE) Pronounced "zeen," a zine is a small periodical containing original and/or copied material with a relatively limited circulation. Self-published, zines date back to the 18th century.
References in periodicals archive ?
FlipHTML5 explains the facts about zines - text and image cut-outs from different sources which are carefully picked and arranged in sequence to express or promote the creator's idea.
Zines can be defined as self-published, DIY magazines, capturing a particular topic of interest, such as personal stories, hobbies, social issues, comics, fandoms, and more.
Zines can be thought of as material objects: in their 2006 instructive book Whatcha Mean, What's a Zine?
Zines are small, handmade magazines--with pages commonly 4.25" x 5.5", a folded half-sheet of copy paper--that reflect topics or themes of significance to the creator.
In her research, Piepmeier refers to zines as "paper artifacts" because they "register the connection of bodies and the passage of time more fully than digital technologies" by physically aging.
5 young comic artists and myself -- based in Beirut, are starting a collective to produce zines seasonally.
While zines are commonly recognized as being the result of non-elitist, do-it-yourself (DIY), participatory culture, and originating from the rise of the punk rock scene in the late 1970s, very few acknowledge their feminist predecessors and the artifacts, scrapbooks, documents, pamphlets, letters, produced by women from disempowered positions during the first and second waves of feminism.
Comstock, however, making use of DeCerteau's concept of "poaching" (the reappropriation, reversal, and, in general, creative misreading of popular and mass cultural texts and discourses), persuasively argues for a less utopian depiction of late twentieth century zines. In her view they are the resistant self-expression of individuals and sub-cultures who simply wish to make a space for themselves within popular and mass culture.
The custom of printing outside of the publishing network became prevalent through the 1970s in the UK and the US in the form of punk fan-zines, though zines as a whole have a much longer history dating back to the 1930s and were first created using carbon paper.
Consistent with this stance, the text follows an episodic and exploratory trajectory through the author's engagement with the three Third Wave feminist collections: the Bingham Center's zine collections, preserved as they were accumulated by individuals like Sarah Dyer of Action Grrrl Newsletter, the semi-restricted papers, including zines, of influential Riot Grrrls such as Kathleen Hanna; and an item-level-cataloged and circulating (!) special collection of zines at Barnard.
A 12-hour festival for zines-small handmade booklets, short for fanzines or magazines-will be held in Cebu tomorrow, April 16, showcasing the work of over 50 zine makers from all over the Philippines and around the world.
It's a brief ode to the Zine Thing column in Thrasher and what zines mean to him, along with a list of five things zines have taught him.