Zoilus


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Zoilus

(zō`ĭləs), c.400–c.320 B.C., Greek rhetorician and philosopher of Amphipolis. He is called Homeromastix [scourge of Homer], because of his denunciations of Homer as a purveyor of fables. He also criticized Isocrates and Plato, and his name has come to signify a carping critic.

Zoilus

 

Ancient Greek philosopher and rhetorician of the fourth century B.C.

Zoilus was born in Amphipolis. He was a pupil of Socrates and, possibly, was Demosthenes’ mentor. Zoilus was an early critic of Homeric texts. He is the author of Censure of Homer and other works. In antiquity, he received the reputation of a subverter of authority. Zoilus’ name is used to designate a carping, ill-disposed, and caustic critic. An example of this usage is A. S. Pushkin’s epigram: “Counting on my contempt, the gray Zoilus railed at me.”

EDITION

Fabricii Bibliotheca graeca, part 1. Hamburg, 1708.

REFERENCES

Tronskii, I.M.Istoriiaantichnoiliteratury, 3rded. Leningrad, 1957.
Istoriia grecheskoi literatury, vol. 1. Edited by S. I. Sobolevskii [et al.]. Moscow-Leningrad, 1946.
Lehrs, K.De Aristarchi studiis Homericis. Leipzig, 1865.
Friedländer, U.De Zoilo aliisque Homeri obtrectatoribus. Königsberg, 1895.

Zoilus

malicious and contentious rhetorician; “Homer’s scourge.” [Gk. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 1175]
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Boccalini, in his "Advertisements from Parnassus," tells us that Zoilus once presented Apollo a very caustic criticism upon a very admirable book: -- whereupon the god asked him for the beauties of the work.
Telling his readers who Zoilus was in the translation, not in the commentary, is strange, while the commentary itself is--as a whole--a mixture of the most different elements: e.g., Kottke discusses grammatical platitudes but also offers useful information about calculating with the fingers; he mentions parallels to older texts but sometimes forgets their interpretation.
/ Black Zoilus, black Momus, furious dog, / Furious mastiff howling at the silvery crescent, / Your calumny never knew how to harm GREENE."
8) y un fondo de sigillata italica con sello ZOIL (Z retrograda y L invertida) de Zoilus (O.C.K.
En el siglo XVIII el poeta y ensayista irlandes Thomas Parnell (1679-1718) tradujo la Batrachomyomachia al ingles y la publico como Homer's Battle of the Frogs and Mice, with the Remarks of Zoilus, To Which is Prefix'd the Life of the Said Zoilus.
Nan is more learned than all the girls, More formidable than fierce Camilla More unable to shut up than Xanthippe [the shrewish wife of Socrates], Bold, garrulous, obstinate, aggressive Fierce, grim comrade of the sister Furies, Momus's daughter [god of ridicule], Zoilus' mother, Writing alarmingly, with watercress-sharp glare, She does not allow you to be careless.
Aber warum findet sich bei Martial (wie ubrigens auch in 3.82 uber Zoilus, der Trimalchio so auffallig gleicht und noch dazu in V.
In opposition to the decreasing love motif in the above letters is the massive presence of the poetry theme (its practice, its meaning and its value) in the second book (letters 2, 3, 4 to the Cardinal Bernard d'Aube, a failing aspirant poet); 10 and 17 to Zoilus, a nickname for Brizio Visconti, Bernabo's powerful son.
of Diomedes]." Zoilus from Ephesus, a commentator of Homer, reproaches the poet because the hero, although literally being on fire, does not risk his life.
(24) But none is earlier than Marston's use of this linguistic formula, which he based on the name "Homeromastix" (The Scourge of Homer) bestowed on Zoilus, the epic poet's sternest critic.
Poe came to fame--or notoriety--by dint of his connection with the Southern Literary Messenger, initially, but notably, as a fearsome book reviewer (the "Zoilus of the Messenger"), and the contents of this volume will add substantial illumination to what has long remained somewhat shadowy despite of "everyone's knowing" (well, almost everyone who pursues Poe with any diligence) about the man and the magazine.