Gale, Zona

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Gale, Zona,

1874–1938, American novelist and short-story writer, b. Portage, Wis., grad. Univ. of Wisconsin, 1895. After five years (1899–1904) of newspaper work in Milwaukee and New York City, she returned to her home town, determined to win success as a fiction writer. Of her bleak, realistic novels of life in the Middle West, Birth (1918), Miss Lulu Bett (1920), and Papa La Fleur (1933) won much attention in their time. Her dramatization of Miss Lulu Bett won the Pulitzer Prize in 1921. Among her other novels are Faint Perfume (1923) and Light Woman (1937).

Gale, Zona

(1874–1938) writer; born in Portage, Wis. She spent most of her life in Wisconsin. She worked briefly as a journalist, but attracted attention as a writer with her early "local color" stories of village life. The fiction of her middle years was realistic; her best-known work, Miss Lulu Brett (1920), was notable for depicting the harshness of Midwestern life. In her later fiction she dealt with more abstract themes and in later years she was a public advocate of pacifism and women's suffrage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Leyendecker and articles by the first woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for drama, Zona Gale.
Pioneras en la escena estadounidense is an essential purchase for any non-English speaking enthusiast of the American drama since it offers a unique opportunity to read Neighbors (Vecinos) by Zona Gale, Trifles (Nimiedades) by Susan Glaspell, Alice Gerstenberg's Overtones (Directas e indirectas) and Zora Neale Hurston's Color Struck (Impacto de color); the plays are accompanied by brief introductory essays.
As she raised her family, she wrote-- poems, diaries, and letters--and although she was, in her words, "nobody famous," she was encouraged by acquaintances like Carl Sandburg, Zona Gale, and Thornton Wilder.
One of the strongest pieces in the collection is Deborah Lindsay Williams's 'Pernicious Contact: Willa Cather and the Problems of Literary Sisterhood', which charts Cather's relationship with the socially committed writer Zona Gale.
His critiques of Zona Gale and Kenneth Burke suggest their failure with that dimension of their fiction.
Their ambivalence pervades the letters each wrote to Zona Gale, the writer who replaced Sara Norton in Wharton's correspondence and who wanted Cather to come live and work in her father's house.
Crewe's Career by Winston Churchill, a novel dealing with control of a state government by a railroad; Friendship Village by Zona Gale, stories of midwestern life; The Iron Heel by Jack London, a novel that predicted the rise of fascism; The Circular Staircase by Mary Roberts Rinehart, the mystery novel that launched her career; and The Metropolis by Upton Sinclair, a novel.
Still Small Voice (1940) is a biography of Zona Gale, and there are several volumes of verse.
Writers of Conviction: The Personal Politics of Zona Gale, Dorothy Canfield Fisher, Rose Wilder Lane, and Josephine Herbst.
He drops Zona Gale (one of only three women) and adds a few other writers, including Joseph Kirkland, E.
Scott Fitzgerald, the author's first novel and a smashing success; Miss Lulu Bett by Zona Gale, a novel of rural life in the Middle West; A Few Figs from Thistles, a collection of poetry by Edna St.
The first, "Placemaking: Gender, Genre, and Geography," offers essays by Donna Campbell, Deborah Lindsay Williams, and Dominika Ferens on Rose Wilder Lane, Edna Ferber, Zona Gale, and Winnifred Eaton's contestation of dominant racial, gender, and class paradigms in their writing.