Zoraptera


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Zoraptera

[zə′rap·tə·rə]
(invertebrate zoology)
An order of insects, related to termites and psocids, which live in decaying wood, sheltered from light; most individuals are wingless, pale in color, and blind.

Zoraptera

 

an order of insects. They undergo incomplete metamorphosis and are probably related in origin to cockroaches and termites. Length, 2–3 mm. The antennae have nine segments and are moniliform; the gnawing mouthparts point forward. The insects have ambulatory legs with two-segmented tarsa; the cercus is short and has one segment. Wings are usually absent; sometimes winged members can be found in a species (their wings can be discarded, as in termites, by breaking off at the base). There is no ovipositor.

There is one genus, Zorotypus, which comprises about 25 species. They are distributed in the tropics and subtropics; there are none in Europe. Zoraptera live hidden, living under plant remains, in the rotten wood of trees, or under tree bark, often forming large masses. They feed on spores and fungus mycelia, dust of rotten wood, and mites.

References in periodicals archive ?
Hexapoda: Isoptera, Mantodea, Mecoptera, Orthoptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera and Zoraptera. Revista Brasileira de Entomologia, 53, 32-35.
Zoraptera, also known as ground lice or angel insects, is one of the less known insect lineages in the world in terms of distribution, diversity and biology (Mashimo et al.
Therefore, any kind of contribution to the Zoraptera study has great value considering the current state of knowledge and how rare they are in the collections.
Cephalic anatomy of Zorotypus hubbardi (Hexapoda: Zoraptera): New evidence for a relationship with Acercaria.
Divergent mating patterns and a unique mode of external sperm transfer in Zoraptera: An enigmatic group of pterygote insects.
The insect orders Hemiptera, Neuroptera, and Zoraptera, as well as the class Diplopoda, were exclusive to the control site, while Isopoda was exclusive to the 30MPB tract.
Critically, there is much evidence to suggest that lineage-specific substitution rate variation is a much greater problem in insects than vertebrates (e.g., Zoraptera, Phthiraptera, Diptera).
Indeed, mites, Collembola, thrips, Psocoptera, Zoraptera, aphids, whiteflies, lice, fleas, and many scale insects, beetles, Diptera, Hymenoptera, and early instars of many insects are simply below the acceptable prey-size range of most vertebrate predators.
Some authors have included Zoraptera in Paraneoptera based on morphological characters (Hennig 1969, 1981; Kristensen 1981; Wheeler et al.
Cephalic anatomy of Zorrotypus hubbardi (Hexapoda: Zoraptera): new evidence for a relationship with Acercaria.
The Zoraptera problem: evidence for Zoraptera + Embiodea from the wing base.
En Hexapoda se incluyen dos capitulos que tratan los "Collembola" y "Protura y Diplura"; un capitulo sobre Insecta Apterygota: "Archaeognatha y Zygentoma"; y 15 capitulos destinados a discutir y describir los grupos de Insecta Hemimetabola que incluyen a "Ephemeroptera", "Odonata", "Plecoptera", "Psocoptera", "Homoptera: (Fulgoroidea, Cicadoidea, Membracoidea, Cercopoidea, Aphidoidea, Aleyrodidae, Psylloidea y Coccoidea)", "Isoptera", "Thysanoptera", "Orthoptera", "Dermaptera", "Zoraptera", "Embioptera" y "Hemiptera: Lygaeidae, Pentatomidae, Reduviidae y Enicocephalomorpha".