Zoraptera

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Zoraptera

[zə′rap·tə·rə]
(invertebrate zoology)
An order of insects, related to termites and psocids, which live in decaying wood, sheltered from light; most individuals are wingless, pale in color, and blind.

Zoraptera

 

an order of insects. They undergo incomplete metamorphosis and are probably related in origin to cockroaches and termites. Length, 2–3 mm. The antennae have nine segments and are moniliform; the gnawing mouthparts point forward. The insects have ambulatory legs with two-segmented tarsa; the cercus is short and has one segment. Wings are usually absent; sometimes winged members can be found in a species (their wings can be discarded, as in termites, by breaking off at the base). There is no ovipositor.

There is one genus, Zorotypus, which comprises about 25 species. They are distributed in the tropics and subtropics; there are none in Europe. Zoraptera live hidden, living under plant remains, in the rotten wood of trees, or under tree bark, often forming large masses. They feed on spores and fungus mycelia, dust of rotten wood, and mites.

References in periodicals archive ?
The first gynandromorph of a zorapteran and potential thelytokous parthenogenesis in a population of Zorotypus brasiliensis Silvestri (Zoraptera: Zorotypidae).
The zorapterans are tiny insects (approximately 2-4 mm length) superficially resembling barklice (Psocoptera) or termites (Blattodea).
The knowledge about the diversity of zorapterans in Colombia is minimal, only the species Zorotypus hamiltoni New, 1978, has been recorded based solely in a male specimen and the paratypes (alate female forms) were dealate prior capture and the wings remained unknown (Rafael and Engel 2006).
One of the main reasons why the diversity of zorapterans is poorly known in Colombia is the lack of native researchers engaged in studying these magnificent insects.
This region is characterized by periods of humid and rainy climates mainly in the months of April and October (IGAC 1977), generating suitable habitats for the establishment of zorapterans based on the observations previously made by Mashimo et al.
This capture methodology could be useful for winged zorapterans if the trap is placed in an appropriate environment.
The drifting winged insects; zorapterans, orthopterans and hymenopterans such as chalcids were found only in the KA with a great difference in the counts of winter and summer.
All around the second-growth vegetation, the fallen trees and branches rot and crumble offering hiding places and food to a vast array of basidiomycete fungi, slime molds, ponerine ants, scolytid beetles, bark lice, earwigs, embiopteran web spinners, zorapterans, entomobryomorph springtails, japygid diplurans, schizomid arachnids, pseudoscorpions, real scorpions, and other forms that live mostly or exclusively in this habitat.