Zwinger


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Zwinger

The protective fortress of a city; the modern name of several German palaces or parts of palaces.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

zwinger

The protective fortress of a city.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Theodor Zwinger, Methodus Apodemica (Basileae, 1577), Hilarius Pyrckmair, Commentariolus de Arte Apodemica seu Vera Peregrinandi Ratione (Ingolstadi, 1577), Hugo de Bloote, Tabula Peregrinationis continens Capita Politica (Norimbergae, 1629), ce dernier contenant 116 questions numerotees sur les institutions politiques et religieuses, sur la aspects sociaux, demographiques, ethniques, economiques des villes traversees par les voyageurs.
Floodwaters threatened to push further into the Semper Opera and the Zwinger art gallery, both already hit by a first wave early this week.
Floodwater damaged landmarks including the Semper Opera and Zwinger Gallery, where volunteers carried masterworks by artists such as Raphael and Rembrandt to higher floors for protection.
Authors taking part in the event are Scott Russell Sanders, William Kittredge, Ann Zwinger, Annick Smith and John Daniel.
--Ann Zwinger, a nature writer whose works include Shaped by Wind and Water: Reflections of a Naturalist
Robyn Wiegman and Lynda Zwinger, in "Tonya's Bad Boot, or, Co Figure," dub the sport, more cynically, "a beauty pageant on ice, a conflation of the talent and bathing suit competitions." The costumes, the choreography and the music do make it seem much more like theatre than an athletic competition--closer to ballet than ice hockey.
From the other side of the Elbe, the great curve of the river bank is punctuated by a series of grand events: the Palace, the Zwinger and Gottfried Semper's Opera House.
In 1577, the Swiss doctor Theodore Zwinger publishes a "Method" (Methodus apodemica) for the travel narrative, inspired by the precepts of persuasive rhetoric, and placing stress on the definition of finalities and the description of means.(3) However, not everything can be covered by such a model: reality has its slack zones, not easily integrated; truth is less a natural given than the product of discursive rules, in some measure uncertain and subject to the irregularities of history.
Nature writer Ann Zwinger takes an intimate look at the Grand Canyon and considers the small, often overlooked creatures that make their home along the banks of the Colorado River.