abalone


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abalone

(ăbəlō`nē), popular name in the United States for a univalve gastropodgastropod,
member of the class Gastropoda, the largest and most successful class of mollusks (phylum Mollusca), containing over 35,000 living species and 15,000 fossil forms.
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 mollusk of the genus Haliotis, members of which are also called ear shells, or sea ears, as their shape resembles the human ear. The shell provides a rooflike covering for the abalone and is perforated by a row of holes on one side through which the animal respires. The iridescent mother-of-pearl shell lining is used to make buttons and other articles. Before protective legislation was enacted, much of the dried flesh and some shells were exported to Asia. Abalone are classified in the phylum MolluscaMollusca
, taxonomic name for the one of the largest phyla of invertebrate animals (Arthropoda is the largest) comprising more than 50,000 living mollusk species and about 35,000 fossil species dating back to the Cambrian period.
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, class Gastropoda, order Archeogastropoda, family Haliotidae.

abalone

[‚ab·ə′lō·nē]
(invertebrate zoology)
A gastropod mollusk composing the single genus Haliotis of the family Haliotidae. Also known as ear shell; ormer; paua.

abalone

any of various edible marine gastropod molluscs of the genus Haliotis, having an ear-shaped shell that is perforated with a row of respiratory holes. The shells are used for ornament or decoration
References in periodicals archive ?
South Africa's abalone, haliotis midae, is particularly revered, and with demand vastly outstripping the legal global supply, black markets for the creature have popped up.
'The abalone trade is a product of massive inequality.
The supply chain extends from the poachers who gather the abalone to the cookhouses where it is dried and the homes of villagers in South Africa who stash the produce.
'What we do know is that, as grazing herbivores, abalone put substantial pressure on algae and kelp,' he says.
'We see the direct benefit being the possible reseeding and restocking of the ocean with Abalone again in a well structured joint partnership with the ministry in Oman as well as local fishermen, whose livelihood has been destroyed by the reduction in the natural abalone resource.
Of the seven species of abalone found along the West Coast of North America (Geiger 1999), pinto abalone have the broadest latitudinal range extending from Salisbury Sound, AK, to Bahia Tortugas, Baja California, Mexico (Fig.
In the northern portion of its range, pinto abalone occurs in intertidal and subtidal habitats (0-20 m depth, most commonly 0-10 m depth; Rothaus et al.
In Alaska, pinto abalone are primarily found in rocky substrates and kelp beds in the lower intertidal and subtidal surge zones on the outer coast of southeast Alaska (Fig.
In Washington, pinto abalone occur from Little Patos Island in the northern San Juan Islands Archipelago (SJA) to just offshore of Cape Flattery in the west entrance of the Strait of Juan de Fuca (SJF) and north of a line formed by Point Wilson and the Keystone Jetty in North Puget Sound (Fig.
"Driven by sophisticated transnational criminal networks and local gangs, the illegal abalone trade has been fueled by deeply entrenched socioeconomic disparities in the Western Cape, bitterly contested fishing quotas, drugs and gang violence," the report said.
"Because of the involvement of organized crime, the apparent links to gangs in Cape Town, the links between the trade in abalone and the trade in drugs, there are also some clear negative socioeconomic impacts associated with it," said Markus Burgener of TRAFFIC in a statement.
The illegal trade extends across sub-Saharan Africa, with 43 percent of illegally harvested abalone coming from non-abalone producing and even landlocked countries exporting to Hong Kong, the report said.