abalone

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abalone

(ăbəlō`nē), popular name in the United States for a univalve gastropodgastropod,
member of the class Gastropoda, the largest and most successful class of mollusks (phylum Mollusca), containing over 35,000 living species and 15,000 fossil forms.
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 mollusk of the genus Haliotis, members of which are also called ear shells, or sea ears, as their shape resembles the human ear. The shell provides a rooflike covering for the abalone and is perforated by a row of holes on one side through which the animal respires. The iridescent mother-of-pearl shell lining is used to make buttons and other articles. Before protective legislation was enacted, much of the dried flesh and some shells were exported to Asia. Abalone are classified in the phylum MolluscaMollusca
, taxonomic name for the one of the largest phyla of invertebrate animals (Arthropoda is the largest) comprising more than 50,000 living mollusk species and about 35,000 fossil species dating back to the Cambrian period.
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, class Gastropoda, order Archeogastropoda, family Haliotidae.

abalone

[‚ab·ə′lō·nē]
(invertebrate zoology)
A gastropod mollusk composing the single genus Haliotis of the family Haliotidae. Also known as ear shell; ormer; paua.

abalone

any of various edible marine gastropod molluscs of the genus Haliotis, having an ear-shaped shell that is perforated with a row of respiratory holes. The shells are used for ornament or decoration
References in periodicals archive ?
The pinto abalone has been taxonomically subdivided into two subspecies: Haliotis kamtschatkana kamtschatkana ranging from Sitka, AK to Point Conception, CA; and Haliotis kamtschatkana assimilis ranging from Monterey, CA to Bahia Tortugas, Baja California, Mexico (Fig.
Genetic tools have been developed to confirm whether there are genetic bases for differences among abalone species and among populations within species.
(2010) developed high fidelity size and sequence polymorphic markers in the reproductive proteins lysin and VERL for forensic analyses of northeastern Pacific abalone species.
For the purpose of this review, pinto abalone will be referred to as one species throughout its range.
Of the seven species of abalone found along the West Coast of North America (Geiger 1999), pinto abalone have the broadest latitudinal range extending from Salisbury Sound, AK, to Bahia Tortugas, Baja California, Mexico (Fig.
In the northern portion of its range, pinto abalone occurs in intertidal and subtidal habitats (0-20 m depth, most commonly 0-10 m depth; Rothaus et al.
Both alga and abalone samples were collected from nature then being cultured in laboratory scale.
The proximate analysis result in Table 1 shows some nutrition components from abalone food, i.e., Water, Ash, Protein, Crude Fibre, and Lipid.
With 50.3% of ash contained in Gracilaria lichenoides, the algae become a better resource of mineral to abalone compared with Ulva fasciata which has 25.7%.
Based on the results, both foods can be assumed to be good as protein and lipid resources for abalone growth, quantitatively, but Ulva fasciata is better qualitatively.
Essential amino acids are the amino acid which are deeply needed for growth of abalone and must invariably exist in abalone's foods because they can not be synthesized by abalone itself.
Those fatty acids, particularly the linolenic, are the essential fatty acid, which influenced the growth of abalone.