abbey

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abbey,

monastic house, especially among Benedictines and Cistercians, consisting of not less than 12 monks or nuns ruled by an abbot or abbess. Many abbeys were originally self-supporting. In the Benedictine expansion after the 8th cent., abbeys were often important centers of learning and peaceful arts and, like FuldaFulda
, city (1994 pop. 58,710), Hesse, central Germany, on the Fulda River. It is a banking and financial center. Manufactures include textiles and clothing. Fulda grew around a Benedictine abbey founded in 744 by Sturmius, a pupil of St. Boniface, the missionary.
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, were sometimes the nuclei of future towns. The buildings surround a church and include a dormitory, refectory, and guest house, all surrounded by a wall. The courtyard, derived from the Roman atriumatrium
, term for an interior court in Roman domestic architecture and also for a type of entrance court in early Christian churches. The Roman atrium was an unroofed or partially roofed area with rooms opening from it. In early times its center held a cooking hearth.
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, was a usual feature, as was the cloistercloister,
unroofed space forming part of a religious establishment and surrounded by the various buildings or by enclosing walls. Generally, it is provided on all sides with a vaulted passageway consisting of continuous colonnades or arcades opening onto a court.
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 or arcade surrounding the court. Cluniac abbeys were always ornate, Cistercian ones notably bare. The CarthusiansCarthusians
, small order of monks of the Roman Catholic Church [Lat. abbr.,=O. Cart.]. It was established by St. Bruno at La Grande Chartreuse (see Chartreuse, Grande) in France in 1084.
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 with their special polity developed an altogether different structure called the charterhouse.

Abbey

The monastic buildings of religious bodies governed by an abbot or abbess.

Abbey

 

a Catholic monastery governed by a father superior or, in a convent, by a mother superior, subordinate to a bishop and sometimes directly to the pope. The larger and wealthier monasteries owned much land and often played an important religious, political, and economic role in feudal Western Europe. Such monasteries included the abbeys of Cluny, Saint-Denis, Port Royal, Saint Gall, Fulda, and Monte Cassino. During the Reformation and especially during the bourgeois revolution, the abbey lost its significance in the life of European society. Many abbeys were liquidated, but some still exist today.

What does it mean when you dream about an abbey?

Dreaming of a convent or monastery may indicate that the dreamer needs to spend some time alone reflecting, or even needs to seek spiritual nourishment. Alternatively, it may symbolize isolation from the normal flow of life.

abbey

abbey: Plan of abbey of St. Germain-des-Prés, Paris, 13th cent. A, church; B, cloister; C, city gate; E, chapter house; F, chapel; G, refectory; H, cellars and presses; I, abbot’s lodging; K, ditches; L, gardens
A monastery or convent; particularly the church thereof.

abbey

1. a building inhabited by a community of monks or nuns governed by an abbot or abbess
2. a church built in conjunction with such a building
3. such a community of monks or nuns
References in classic literature ?
Greater wonder than these, when a bottle-nosed person in a glazed hat had after some considerable hesitation ordered another glass of gin and water of the attendant potboy, and when Miss Abbey, instead of sending it, appeared in person, saying, 'Captain Joey, you have had as much as will do you good,' not only did the captain feebly rub his knees and contemplate the fire without offering a word of protest, but the rest of the company murmured, 'Ay, ay, Captain
Exactly at the closing hour, all the guests who were left, filed out in the best order: Miss Abbey standing at the half door of the bar, to hold a ceremony of review and dismissal.
You Bob Gliddery,' said Miss Abbey to this pot-boy, 'run round to Hexam's and tell his daughter Lizzie that I want to speak to her.
I have had mine too, I think,' said Miss Abbey, pushing away the untasted dish, 'and more than enough of it.
Then why, in the name of Goodness,' quoth Miss Abbey, sharply,
I vow and declare I am half ashamed of myself for taking such an interest in you,' said Miss Abbey, pettishly, 'for I don't believe I should do it if you were not good-looking.
The relief of hearing what she felt sure was a false suspicion, in place of the expected real and true one, so lightened Lizzie's breast for the moment, that Miss Abbey was amazed at her demeanour.
In the sound good feeling and good sense of her entreaty, Miss Abbey had softened into a soothing tone, and had even drawn her arm round the girl's waist.
And then Miss Abbey, who, like all hard people when they do soften, felt that there was considerable compensation owing to her, underwent reaction and became frigid.
The Fellowships,' returned Miss Abbey, 'has itself to look to, as well as others.
The cold repast was over, and the party were to go out once more to see what had not yet been seen, the old Abbey fishponds; perhaps get as far as the clover, which was to be begun cutting on the morrow, or, at any rate, have the pleasure of being hot, and growing cool again.
There was a sullen darkness in the sky, and the sun had gone angrily down, tinting the dull clouds with the last traces of his wrath, when the same black monk walked slowly on, with folded arms, within a stone's-throw of the abbey.