Abducens Nerve


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Related to Abducens Nerve: trochlear nerve

Abducens Nerve

 

either member of the sixth pair of cranial nerves. The abducens nerve originates in a motor nucleus in the pons on the floor of the rhomboid fossa. The outgrowths of the cells of this nucleus emerge from the brain at a point that lies between the pons and the pyramid of the medulla oblongata. Forming a single nerve trunk, the outgrowths exit from the cranial cavity through the superior orbital fissure and innervate the lateral rectus muscle of the eye, which turns the eyeball outward.

Lesions of the abducens nerve interfere with the mobility of the eyeball and can result in anomalies of the eyeball’s orientation. The latter condition is known as esotropia. Dizziness, double vision, and constrained head movements can also arise as a result of injury to the abducens nerve.

References in periodicals archive ?
08 times more incidence of abducens nerve palsy than that of diabetes alone.
The classic symptoms of petrous apicitis include deep facial pain, constant otorrhea and ipsilateral abducens nerve paralysis.
Cholesteatoma is the most common neoplasm located at the CPA,[sup][1] and it wraps up the abducens nerve and grows toward the ventral side of pons.
4) Also, cranial neuropathies are seen in as many as 50% of cases; the oculomotor nerve is generally considered to be the most frequently involved nerve, (5) although one series found that the abducens nerve was the most common cranial nerve involved in sphenoid pathologies, including neoplasms.
Otoneurological test showed abducens nerve palsy left side.
A case of ecchordosis physaliphora presenting with an abducens nerve palsy: A rare symptomatic case managed with endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery.
1) Though the abducens nerve (CN6) and facial nerve (CN7) involvement is the main finding, it can be expanded to involvement of nearly all cranial nerves.
38) Abducens nerve paresis may be causes by ischaemia, local inflammation, or increased intracranial pressure.
We considered surgery initially for the temporal bone lesion because the patient had lateral-gaze palsy, which had probably been caused by compression of the abducens nerve and therefore required immediate decompression.
Abducens nerve is the second vulnerable CN because it has the longest intracranial course and is, therefore, susceptible to direct or indirect insult like microvascular infarction or direct compression.
Isolated abducens nerve palsy with hyperhomocysteinemia: Association and outcomes.
Transient visual obscurations due to papilledema, diplopia secondary to abducens nerve paresis, visual field loss, pulsatile tinnitus, and dizziness may be additional complaints.