aberrant

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aberrant

[ə′ber·ənt]
(biology)
An atypical group, individual, or structure, especially one with an aberrant chromosome number.
References in periodicals archive ?
Quickly analyze findings of aberrance to identify potential level of waste or abuse and address it within the right areas of your plan.
Each week, the England and Wales detection system flags [approximately equal to]20 organisms, listed in decreasing order of aberrance, for further investigation.
Because her aberrance and her action takes place while she is a girl and not a full-grown woman like the other female figures in the film, Pognere can be viewed as an optimistic portrayal of a feminist future.
In this sense, they are deterritorializations in Deleuzian terms--excursions into unexplored territory through the rejection of the a priori--whose aberrance and unfamiliarity call for contemplation and thought.
During data analyses, aberrance appeared which could indicate possible group collaboration during exams.
99) As a mass movement with tens of thousands of members, this rejection rate still meant that thousands of people were prevented from subscribing to fraternal insurance as a result of their physical aberrance.
These changes include defects in collagen and laminin compositions and aberrance of integrin receptors.
Bush goes on to normativize (implying the aberrance of competing beliefs) democratic values: "the values of freedom are right and true for every person, in every society--and the duty of protecting these values against their enemies is the common calling of freedom-loving people across the globe and across the ages.
In this regard, art history has inadvertently given us the means of attributing aberrance to the art of our age, since the current pluralism contradicts the historical model of a succession of discrete period or cultural styles as blatantly as the aperiodicity of chaos contradicts the regularity of the clockwork universe.
121) Arguably, at least some criminal conduct can be seen as an expected result of an individual's membership in a certain type of organization, rather than simply employee aberrance.
What I am suggesting here is that our interpretation of Faulkner beyond the US has to be diversified on both sides of the intercultural enquiry: if attentiveness to Faulkner's borderlands (geographical, cultural, stylistic, psychological) and the divided identity and conceptual aberrance of the American South are interpretative necessities, as suggested by Richard Gray, Barbara Ladd, and others, then the same dynamics should pertain to our interpretation of cultural contexts into which Faulkner's work has been translated.