abiotic


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Related to abiotic: abiotic environment, Abiotic stress

abiotic

[¦a‚bī′äd·ik]
(biology)
Referring to the absence of living organisms.
References in periodicals archive ?
The second edition also covers: Bacterial, fungal, and viral diseases; Insect and mite pests; Abiotic disorders, such as herbicide injury and environmental stressors; Diseases caused by an alga; Diseases caused by a phytoplasma; The use and effects of cultural practices; The development of healthy planting materials in the nursery/greenhouse industry.
Abiotic factors play a significant role in population fluctuation of insect pests (Murugan and Uthamasamy, 2001).
However, it is known that several molecular and physiological changes are occurred in plants due to abiotic stresses (Chinnusamy et al.
Abiotic stresses, such as drought, salinity, and low and high temperatures greatly reduce wheat productivity and quality, which is a result of accelerating reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulations such as hydroxyl radicals (*OH), superoxide radicals ([O.
As part of the agreement, Arcadia and Beck's will jointly invest in commercial development of abiotic stress and yield traits, with both companies sharing in the commercial value of resulting products.
Scientists presented a novel hypothesis that it could be possible for planets to have large quantities of abiotic (non-biologically produced) oxygen.
Odonata larvae are dependent on the habitat characteristics, are sensitive to abiotic variations and have an important role as predator and prey in the trophic structure of aquatic communities (Gomez-Anaya et al.
Community differences across time of day and season and the influence of abiotic variables were analyzed with ANOSIM and BIO-ENV, respectively.
In 10 chapters, biologists and other scientists from the US, Asia, Saudi Arabia, and Australia explore the inanimate components of the environment associated with climatic, edaphic, and physiographic factors that limit plant growth and survival, specifically plant abiotic stresses caused by flooding, drought, salinity, non-optimal temperatures, and poor soil nutrition, as well as stresses that originate from climate change and its potential impacts on crop production.
Biotic or abiotic stressors cause massive protein translation that may subsequently lead to misfolding of nascent peptides.
These microorganisms adapt to stressful environments by attaching to abiotic surfaces and forming a biofilm--a highly structured community of sessile cells embedded within a matrix of extracellular polymeric substance--and biofilm formation plays a critical role in colonization of catheters.