abjection


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abjection

[ab′jek·shən]
(mycology)
The discharge or casting off of spores by the spore-bearing structure of a fungus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Body Parts of Empire' is a study of abjection in American visual culture and popular literature from the Philippine-American War (1899-1902).
Keywords: Philip Ridley, Contemporary British Drama, Jacques Lacan, Julia Kristeva, psychoanalytic critical theory, abjection
poetry emerges in a crux of ascendance and abjection in unexpected, uneven, and subterranean ways.
Abjection is a dicey concept, I realize, or at least a dicey word.
This understanding of adolescence relies on two overlapping conceptualizations from Kristeva's work: abjection from Powers of Horror and adolescence from a chapter in New Maladies of the Soul.
Abjection lives in the dark heart and I experience my repulsion/desire: a bodily experience of the visceral and domestic, this link to food, to body.
Another is a Romantic embrace of abjection, at odds with the measured calm of his novels.
The abjection of the Other becomes one of the subtexts of the story, and the image of the boat one of its early representations.
Gauna emphasize this ambiguity--the question the body poses to political power--in several ways, which I will characterize as abjection, projection, and introjection.
How does the idea of abjection become part of the plot of Monoceros, potentially affecting the reception of the novel?
Focusing particularly on "The Artificial Nigger," "Greenleaf," The Violent Bear it Away, and "The Enduring Chill," she traces how O'Connor interrogates culturally defined boundaries to illustrate the "transformative possibilities of the borderline place," revealing the ways abjection and violence can be redemptive (82).
Il mio saggio si ripropone di colmare questa lacuna analizzando l'estraniamento e l'ineffabilita--i tratti principali che legano le vicissitudini dei protagonisti delle opere in questione e dei loro rispettivi autori--attraverso l'artificio retorico che ho deciso di chiamare "objective correlative", coniugando le istanze moderniste esposte da TS Eliot nella raccolta di saggi The Sacred Wood (1920) con la teoria della abjection postulata da Julia Kristeva in Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection (1982).