abjection


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abjection

[ab′jek·shən]
(mycology)
The discharge or casting off of spores by the spore-bearing structure of a fungus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although it is beautiful, Delbo's work is also stained with abjection, the reminder of what will always evade the soothing impulse of mourning.
Coetzee, whose ouevre he sees as focused on abjection, disgrace, and the condition of the outcast.
The social abjection of Bride's colour and her own dejection reinforce the traumatic backlash that wreaks havoc in her quest for identity.
The Department of Filipino of Ateneo de Manila University and Ateneo University Press will launch professor Nerissa Balce-Cortes' new book, 'Body Parts of Empire: Visual Abjection, Filipino Images, and the American Archive,' today, Aug.
This paper uses the frameworks of Girardian mimetic desire coupled with Kristevan abjection to interrogate the representation of woman as a social object in the novels of Jeanette Winterson and Eimear McBride.
Though elements of Kelly's past works more forcefully evoke goiters and colons, hair and flesh, these sculptures achieve abjection in a more oblique way.
This chaotic atmosphere which calls for the governmental intervention in the end is established through the burst of the Real, abjection, and the shift in subject positions.
The exchange and its aftermath enacted the historical tension between the ascendance of Latinos--undergirding Trump's rhetoric is the fear of Latino hordes transforming the nation--and their abjection, the persistent forms of abuse and diminishment to which Latinos are subjected in the public sphere.
Once I began rereading Leduc, starting with La Batarde, I quickly realized what the conference should focus on: abjection, specifically the twentieth-century tradition of first-person narratives of women's sexual abjection that these three writers variously represent, in terms, respectively and (to some extent) collectively, of the place of women in general, social class and aesthetic norms, and sexuality.
I show how Carlsen's generalizations about adolescence, like so many others, reflect the psychoanalytic notion of abjection, a foundational concept in theorizations of queer subjectivity that I find central to the logic of adolescence.
It is both joyous and horrific, containing jouissance and abjection.