ablation

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ablation

1. Medicine the surgical removal of an organ, structure, or part
2. Astronautics the melting or wearing away of an expendable part, such as the heat shield of a space re-entry vehicle on passing through the earth's atmosphere
3. Geology the wearing away of a rock or glacier

ablation

(ab-lay -shŏn) The loss of material from the surface of a moving body as a result of vaporization, friction, etc. For example, atmospheric atoms and molecules erode the surface of a meteoroid and damage the protective heat shield of a returning space shuttle.

Ablation

 

in glaciology, the wasting of the mass of a glacier or snow cover as a result of thawing, evaporation, or mechanical removal—for example, wind ablation or the falling of icebergs. It is caused chiefly by climatic factors.

Three types of ablation are distinguished according to place of appearance: subglacial (or bottom), internal, and surface. The internal heat of the earth, springs (particularly warm ones) surfacing in the glacier bed, and heat caused by the friction of the glacier in its bed are some of the causes of subglacial ablation. Internal ablation is caused by friction between the glacier components and by the circulation of water and air. The glacier surface receives warmth predominantly from solar radiation and from the air. The thermal balance of the glacier surface is the basis of all surface ablation processes. The term “ablation” is sometimes used as well as a synonym for “surface washoff.”

ablation

[ə′blā·shən]
(aerospace engineering)
The intentional removal of material from a nose cone or spacecraft during high-speed movement through a planetary atmosphere to provide thermal protection to the underlying structure.
(geology)
The wearing away of rocks, as by erosion or weathering.
(hydrology)
The reduction in volume of a glacier due to melting and evaporation.
(medicine)
The removal of tissue or a part of the body by surgery, such as by excision or amputation.
References in periodicals archive ?
"A number of us were quite circumspect about this based on the CASTLE-AF data, but the new CABANA analyses have addressed our anxiety that the CASTLE-AF results were just by chance." The new CABANA analyses "may not confirm CASTLE-AF, but it enriches the conversation and makes it possible that we are seeing benefit in some patients with heart failure who get ablated."
To confirm whether eyestalk ablation induced stress, hemolymph (glucose and protein concentrations) from five individuals at the premolt stage in the unablated and ablated groups was analyzed.
At electrode retrieval, all tracts were ablated. Regarding MWA, maximum tissue temperature exceeded 110[degrees]C and the procedural time was 3–6 min (median 4.4 min).
Therefore, the fiber bundle is gradually ablated from the vertical surface to the center, leading to the needle-like shape of II.
While this is obviously a limitation, qualitative information can meet the first monitoring goal for ablation treatments that is to appraise the extent of the region which is being actually ablated and the boundary between treated and untreated tissue.
First, the bottom surface of the Al, which will be contacted to the Cu directly, is ablated. Only the oxide layer next to the welded area will be removed, the residual anodization on the workpiece can be preserved.
For maximum height, ablated, control, and sham-ablated jumps, achieved mean maximum heights of 1.9, 2.0, and 1.3 cm, respectively.
Therefore, HIFUA can be conducted safely and comfortably, accompanied by high ultrasonic intensity due to shallow location.7,8 In contrast, UFs on the posterior wall, which are close to the sacrum and surrounded by a large number of nervous tissues, can only be ablated painfully with severe ultrasonic attenuation.
The protruding structure was found to be prominent as compared to condition where vapour carbon ablated being quenched at substrate (Fig.
After laser irradiation, the ablated surfaces ofthe samples were inspected with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM: Hitachi SU-8010) and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) which is the component of SEM.
This new ultrasound imaging technology enables cardiologists to see exactly where the catheter is in the heart in real time via a screen in the catheter laboratory, providing more accurate information to help guide the cardiologist to target the correct part of the heart to be ablated.
Heavy sections where solidification is slower typically show higher cooling rates when ablated. These characteristics of ablation are expected to lead to a more refined microstructure, especially in the case of the interdendritic eutectic, and a uniform distribution of reinforcement particles.