ablaut


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Related to ablaut: metathesis, umlaut, suppletion

ablaut

(äp`lout) [Ger.,=off-sound], in inflectioninflection,
in grammar. In many languages, words or parts of words are arranged in formally similar sets consisting of a root, or base, and various affixes. Thus walking, walks, walker have in common the root walk and the affixes -ing, -s, and -er.
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, vowel variation (as in English sing, sang, sung, song) caused by former differences in syllabic accent. In a prehistoric period the corresponding inflected forms of the language (known through internal reconstruction) had differences in accent rather than in vowel. Phonological change resulted in alteration of syllable structure and in vowel gradation. See umlautumlaut
[Ger.,=transformed sound], in inflection, variation of vowels of the type of English man to men. In this instance it is the end product of the effect of a y (long since disappeared) that was present in the plural; the y
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References in periodicals archive ?
The evidence presented in this article, which concurs with the authors cited below on this question, indicates that ablaut formations like draf are losing ground in Old English to derivatives with the vocalic grade of the infinitive such as gedrif.
One of the most prevalent plural shapes in Jibbali involves ablaut or vowel opposition.
While the motivation of a significant part of the contrast holding between strong verbs and their derivatives is to be found in ablaut, some correspondences between the strong verb and its derivatives clearly fall out of the scope of this phenomenon.
As PKh *i is the high ablaut grade of original *a (Helimski 2001; [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] 2006 : 42), the underlying Ob-Ugric vowel correspondence is PKh *a ~ PMs *c.
This mechanism occurs in combination with oblique markers Hunzib oze 'boy'), epenthetic vowels (Khwarshi bolo 'wolf) and ablaut (Bezhta bolo 'neck').
The fourth category, vocalization or ablaut, has been long known through its frequent appearance in the formation of the various verb stems.
On the other hand, she continues to inform us copiously ablaut British Victorian Roman Catholic writings, many of them likely influences upon Hopkins (pp.
Certainly there are lingering concerns ablaut first costs and return on investment (ROI), but the USGBC's accelerating growth is due, in large part, to more and more companies realizing that the environment and the economy can co-exist very profitably and--literally--under one roof.
In Old English, both the ablaut formation and suffixation existed with the same meaning" (Bybee, et al.
This front-back distinction looks very much like the same kind of ablaut variation one finds between, say, Greek [pi][omicron][delta][omicron][zeta](podos, with mid back rounded [o]; English cognate podiatrist) and Latin pedis (with mid front unrounded [e]; cognate pedestrian), both meaning "foot," and both coming from the PIE root *ped-.
After noting the existence of an Indo-European ablaut *mero/*moro which denotes an adjective meaning "gross" as revealed by Celtic -maros, Germanic -merus, and Greek -[GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], Schmidt lists several facts which for him point to a borrowing of the Slavic from the Germanic.