ablaut

(redirected from ablauts)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

ablaut

(äp`lout) [Ger.,=off-sound], in inflectioninflection,
in grammar. In many languages, words or parts of words are arranged in formally similar sets consisting of a root, or base, and various affixes. Thus walking, walks, walker have in common the root walk and the affixes -ing, -s, and -er.
..... Click the link for more information.
, vowel variation (as in English sing, sang, sung, song) caused by former differences in syllabic accent. In a prehistoric period the corresponding inflected forms of the language (known through internal reconstruction) had differences in accent rather than in vowel. Phonological change resulted in alteration of syllable structure and in vowel gradation. See umlautumlaut
[Ger.,=transformed sound], in inflection, variation of vowels of the type of English man to men. In this instance it is the end product of the effect of a y (long since disappeared) that was present in the plural; the y
..... Click the link for more information.
.
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, the general impact of alternations was contextualised with respect to ablaut formations and zero derivation in general.
As this analysis has shown, variable morphological bases as represented by alternations and verbal ablaut based on the preterit and the past participle outnumber invariable bases of morphology.
"Ablaut Variation in the Proto-Germanic Noun: The Long Arm of the Strong Verbs." Sprachwissenschaft 33 (3): 279-300.
In explanatory terms, it must be underlined that the number of formations on the ablaut of the verb (587) is outnumbered by alternating formations (644).
We have devised a methodology that consists of the following steps: (i) the retrieval of all records of strong verbs from the lexical database of Old English Nerthus (www.nerthusproject.com); (6) (ii) the identification of all inflectional forms of strong verbs relevant for derivational morphology; (iii) the isolation of basic strong verbs; (iv) the compilation of derivational paradigms; (v) the identification of the vocalic contrasts holding in derivation; (vi) the classification of the contrasts based on ablaut; and (vii) the distinction of phonologically motivated alternations from instances of allomorphic variation.
Focusing on contrasts not related to ablaut, this research has yielded 854 instances, which makes an average of approximately three per derivational paradigm.
The list of the contrasts not attributable to ablaut that constitute alternations of the type presented in figure 4 is given in figure 5.