Abomasum

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abomasum

[‚ab·ō′mā·səm]
(vertebrate zoology)
The final chamber of the complex stomach of ruminants; has a glandular wall and corresponds to a true stomach.

Abomasum

 

the fourth and last part of the multicompartmental stomach of ruminants, corresponding to the simple uncompartmental stomach of most mammals. The abomasum is connected to the omasum (third stomach) and the duodenum. The mucous membrane of the abomasum is covered by prismatic epithelium and contains fundic, pyloric, and cardiac glands. It forms 13 or 14 long folds, which enlarge its surface. In young animals the mucous membrane of the abomasum produces rennin. The muscular membrane of the abomasum consists of external longitudinal and internal circular layers. Food is digested in the abomasum by gastric juice.

References in periodicals archive ?
7), sugeriram que a alimentacao, o fornecimento de pastagem nova, estacao do ano, sexo ou tipo de raca nao sao fatores necessarios na patogenese da ulcera abomasal.
Gaynor PJ, Erdman RA, Teter BB, Sampugna J, Capuco AV, Waldo DR, Hamosh M (1994) Milk fat yield and composition during abomasal infusion of cis of trans octadecenoates in Holstein cows.
Biochemical profiles in cows with abomasal displacement estimated by blood and liver parameters.
1964) Influence of ruminal, abomasal and intestinal fistulation on digestion in steers.
Trichostrongyloidea: Haemonchinae), an abomasal nematode in Odocoileus virginianus from Costa Rica, and a new record for species of the genus in the Western Hemisphere.
Effect of sampling intervals and digesta markers on abomasal flow determinations.
High haptoglobin levels have been reported in the blood of cattle with mastitis, metritis, pyometra, traumatic reticulitis, abomasal displacement, traumatic pericarditis, bacterial nephritis, and hepatic lipidosis.
Abomasal nematodes of sheep and goats slaughtered in Awassa (Ethiopia): species composition, prevalence and vulvar morphology.
1978) and abomasal ulcers (DIVERS & PEEK, 2008a) are the most common causes of CVCT in young animals.
Furthermore, hypocalcemia reduces smooth muscle contraction, leading to reduced rumen and abomasal motility, resulting in abomasal displacement and reduced feed intake.
The present report describes successful surgical management of an umbilical hernia with an abomasal fistula in a six months old female cow calf.