Aboriginal

(redirected from aboriginally)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

Aboriginal

1. of, relating to, or characteristic of the native peoples of Australia
2. another word for an Australian Aborigine
References in periodicals archive ?
In seventy-five of the seventy-six judicial rulings produced over the course of the Pickton trial and appeals, there is no reference to the Aboriginally of these women.
The processed cheese samples were then covered aboriginally. Two samples were then placed in a plastic bag, and sealed, followed by storage at 4[degrees]C (1,320 h), 10[degrees]C (768 h), 15[degrees]C (120 h), 25[degrees]C (48 h), and 30[degrees]C (24 h).
* Support the development, and funding, of aboriginally controlled national strategies to improve housing, education, health care, social services and the administration of justice;
(15) Taking the Indigenous connection to land and its conflict with western knowledge systems as a focus, Rose's work has continually advocated for a shift in the perception of an 'Aboriginally' which can 'only be lost, not recovered.' (16) In a similar approach, Byrne has shown how the 'discovery' of Indigenous cultural artefacts, as well as the creation of a national identity linked to the 'white Aussie bushman' has translated traditional Indigenous artefacts into the white landscape, allowing for their appropriation into that landscape, and strengthening the connection of white Australia to the land, solidifying their identity as 'original Australians'.
Apart from some assessments featuring sentencing circles and singular initiatives such as Hollow Water, formal evaluations of specific initiatives have tended to focus on the offender and conventional CJS measures of success, and to be justificatory--i.e., "mainstream CJS programs do not work for us but Aboriginally administered ones do".
In place of individuals with self-enclosed subjectivities, Nancy puts singularities that are aboriginally partages, shared, sheared, open to an abyssal outside.
Following the notions of Indigenous media scholar Faye Ginsburg on how aboriginally controlled media production enables cultural activism and transformative action, the book aims to deliver concrete examples of how these media "permit increasing cultural and social agency among indigenous groups, and how aboriginal media producers conceive of traditional knowledge." (Introduction, 7) The volume is structured in three parts and features recent case studies in Aboriginal film and communication projects.
A child (who may turn out an idiot) is born by the action of even more complex laws, and I can see no reason why a man, or other animal, may not have been aboriginally produced by other laws, and that all these laws may have been expressly designed by an omniscient Creator, who foresaw every future event and consequence.
Many were aboriginally produced in California then traded to more northerly tribes.
When the Red Power activists of the late 1960s and early 1970s took over Alcatraz, marched on Washington and then trashed the office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and swiped at the besieging army at Wounded Knee, they were committing cultural acts in which they sought social and political power through a complicated play of white guilt, nostalgia, and the deeply rooted desire to be Indian and more aboriginally true to the spirit of the land.
(72) In particular, it reflected, as Anthony Moran has noted, the fact that settlers in Canada, like their counterparts elsewhere, had to "engage with histories of indigenous dispossession in order to explain the nature and quality of their national existence." (73) The erasing of Aboriginally from the prairies was not evidence of ignorance of their presence historically and otherwise.
Gottschall reminds us that "anthropology has revealed no aboriginally peaceful peoples, much less the prelapsarian world of primitive harmony envisioned by Rousseau and his many followers" (41).