abrade

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abrade

[ə′brād]
(geology)
To wear away by abrasion or friction.

abrade

To wear away or scrape off a surface, especially by friction.
References in periodicals archive ?
The TTM (with units kg/m) is the sum of the total mass of introduced abrader (TT[M.
Caption: Figure 3--example of angle abrader results
012-in) sieve with finger pressure to assure that any soil aggregates were broken, and the amounts of abrader and soil were determined by weighing.
The tool/handle material also resembles that used to make an abrader which was excavated at Mouth Olo (artefact SU/A 17/111 in Auckland Museum).
A comparison of abrasion resistance, as measured on a DIN abrader and the SiC abrader, is shown in figure 4.
Stop mixer and discharge batch Table 3--specimens standard cure times and temperatures Specimens Cure time Temperature Tensile sheets 20' 160[degrees]C 150x150x2 mm Drum abrader (diam.
Porites coral abraders were also common and probably used in fishhook manufacture (see Allen 1992; Rolett and Conte 1995:218,220).
Wear attrition was determined according to BS903A9 by using an Akron Abrader machine (MN-74).
The equipment used for physico-chemical and compound property characterization of carbon black and rubber vulcanizates included: OAN or DBPA (Brabender DBP machine Model E, with DADS software from Hitech), nitrogen surface area (Quantachrome), aggregate size (Bi-DCP, Brookhaven Instruments), tint (Erichsen tint tester), Mooney viscometer (MV 2000--Alpha Technologies), moving die rheometer (MDR 2000--Alpha Technologies), hardness (IRHD, Wallace), tensile tester (Zwick Z010), dispersion (Dispergrader 1000 GT, Optigrade AB), abrasion (Zwick Abrader 6102), rebound resilience (Zwick 5109), tan 8 and heat build-up at different temperatures (Goodrich Flexometer, Model II).
The DIN 2200 abrader features a digital speed adjustment and test timer for more detailed and accurate testing.
Figure 12 shows the abrasion resistance of all the compounds measured by the Pico abrader, which provides a cutting abrasion resistance.
2] surface area (Quantachrome); aggregate size (Bi-DCR Brookhaven Instruments); tint (Erichsen Tint Tester); toluene discoloration (Shimadzu UV spectrophotometer); Mooney viscometer, (MV 2000) and rheometer (MDR 2000, Alpha Technologies USA); hardness (IRHD, Wallace); tensile tester (Zwick Z010); abrasion (Zwick Abrader 6102); and rebound resilience (Zwick 5109); tan [delta] and heat buildup at different temperatures (Goodrich Flexometer, Model II); and crack growth and initiation (DeMattia flexometer, Gibitre).