absinthe


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absinthe

(ăb`sĭnth), an emerald-green liqueurliqueur
, strong alcoholic beverage made of almost neutral spirits, flavored with herb mixtures, fruits, or other materials, and usually sweetened. The name derives from the Latin word to melt.
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 distilled from wormwoodwormwood,
Mediterranean perennial herb or shrubby plant (Artemisia absinthium) of the family Asteraceae (aster family), often cultivated in gardens and found as an escape in North America. It has silvery gray, deeply incised leaves and tiny yellow flower heads.
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 and other aromatics, including angelica root, sweet-flag root, star anise, and dittany, which have been macerated and steeped in alcohol. It was invented in the 1790s by a Dr. Pierre Ordinaire, a Frenchman who lived in Switzerland, and the liqueur became enormously popular, particularly in late-19th-century Paris. Genuine absinthe is 70% to 80% alcohol. Because it caused harmful neurological effects (due to the presence of thujone, a toxic chemical in wormwood), absinthe was banned in many countries; where it still is available it is no longer as toxic as it once was.

Bibliography

See study by J. Adams (2004).

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

absinthe

[ab′santh]
(food engineering)
A green liqueur having a bitter licorice flavor and a high alcohol content.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

absinthe

, absinth
1. another name for wormwood (the plant)
2. a potent green alcoholic drink, technically a gin, originally having high wormwood content
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Absinthe is traditionally distilled with botanicals like wormwood, anise and fennel and ranges from 90 to 150 proof.
The saline also subdued the sharp boozy edges of the absinthe. Waugh says that in general, absinthe and salt make an excellent combination.
Written by veteran horror author Tony-Paul de Vissage, Absinthe Eternal chronicles a "ghost hunter" assigned to prove whether or not a New Orleans plantation house is haunted and the truths he learns during his stay in the mansion.
Reminiscent of libraries, anise-tinged absinthe mingles with the notes of artemisia, a hardy shrub; a woody wild plant called cypriol; and rich leather for Leather and Artemisia.
25 ml cognac dash gomme syrup dash Angostura bitters champagne spray of absinthe Built on the rocks in a silver cup.
Victorian Lemonade at The Victoria Ingredients: Gin, lemon juice, almond syrup, angostura bitters, absinthe. Price: PS6.50 Absinthe is another spirit people avoid but it's best served in a cocktail.
Educators illuminated misconceptions, such as the well-known myth that the wormwood in absinthe causes hallucinations (it doesn't; absinthe's high alcohol content of 50-70 percent is the culprit there).
Absinthe was (and perhaps still is) a favoured drink among artists and composers of vision and flair, including composer Erik Satie and writer Ernest Hemingway who invented a similarly dangerous cocktail called "Death in the Afternoon."
"I didn't get to choose any of my tipples in the various bars we visited, which is why I found myself downing a pint of heavy, followed by a massive glass of absinthe and then some rather odd cocktails.
The game's latest victim was apparently told that sculling a whole bottle of absinthe, which has as much as 90 per cent of alcohol, was akin to "suicide," but still continued with his plan.
Under current EU regulations, absinthe does not have to contain any thujone to justify the name, but also must not exceed a maximum of 35 milligrams of thujone per kilogram.