absinthe

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absinthe

(ăb`sĭnth), an emerald-green liqueurliqueur
, strong alcoholic beverage made of almost neutral spirits, flavored with herb mixtures, fruits, or other materials, and usually sweetened. The name derives from the Latin word to melt.
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 distilled from wormwoodwormwood,
Mediterranean perennial herb or shrubby plant (Artemisia absinthium) of the family Asteraceae (aster family), often cultivated in gardens and found as an escape in North America. It has silvery gray, deeply incised leaves and tiny yellow flower heads.
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 and other aromatics, including angelica root, sweet-flag root, star anise, and dittany, which have been macerated and steeped in alcohol. It was invented in the 1790s by a Dr. Pierre Ordinaire, a Frenchman who lived in Switzerland, and the liqueur became enormously popular, particularly in late-19th-century Paris. Genuine absinthe is 70% to 80% alcohol. Because it caused harmful neurological effects (due to the presence of thujone, a toxic chemical in wormwood), absinthe was banned in many countries; where it still is available it is no longer as toxic as it once was.

Bibliography

See study by J. Adams (2004).

absinthe

[ab′santh]
(food engineering)
A green liqueur having a bitter licorice flavor and a high alcohol content.

absinthe

, absinth
1. another name for wormwood (the plant)
2. a potent green alcoholic drink, technically a gin, originally having high wormwood content
References in periodicals archive ?
An opening wedge to return absinthe to the world marketplace came with the observation that while France had banned the sale of absinthe, it had never banned its production, and many distilleries had, and still have, been producing similar products all along.
[Note: Absinthe is different from Pastis, the most famous brand of which is Ricard.
Absinthe, the often emerald colored, highly potent spirit, banned for most of the 20th century in Europe and until 2007 in the United States for supposed madness-inducing properties, was called The Green Fairy by its devoted touts, whose number included so many artists and writers that absinthe's nom de plume became the Green Muse.
"Absinthe is not a shot," said Brian McNally, proprietor of the Old Timer in Clinton, which added the drink to its bar late last year.
in 2007, absinthe is finding a second life in American cocktail bars, including in Sarasota, where you can find it at Pangea Alchemy Lab.
ABSINTHE. IT WAS THE PREFERRED DRINK of your favorite artists and writers--think Oscar Wilde, Pablo Picasso, Vincent van Gogh--as they sat sipping in French cafes in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
"I wanted to do absinthe for several reasons," says Amy Eldredge, assistant manager at Under Current Club.
An SRO crowd of about 150 people got a chance to lift their spirits at the Worcester Art Museum Thursday night with a taste of absinthe, a recently legalized green-tinged drink that inspired writers and artists for centuries.
"There's so much interest in it and its history; there's a lot of education needed on absinthe, which is actually a great opportunity for bartenders."
Absinthe's creator, French physician Pierre Ordinaire, fled to Switzerland during the French Revolution and found wormwood, (Artemisia absinthium) growing wild.
Not only are the classic cocktails promoted on the understated Absinthe bar list authentic; to establish their provenance, some are listed along with the cocktail book from which barman and all-around cocktail historian Marcovaldo Dionysus gathered the drinks.