absolute inequality

absolute inequality

[′ab·sə‚lüt ‚in·ē′kwäl·ə·dē]
(mathematics)
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In his presentation titled, 'The loitering lettuces and the despotic drummers', Samuel Fasanmi, an industrial and organisational psychologist from Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago-Iwoye in Ogun State said there can never be peace in an environment characterized by injustice, massive hunger, poverty, youth unemployment and absolute inequality.
Subsidized schemes tend to increase absolute inequality in the economy.
Resultantly, subsidised schemes tend to increase absolute inequality in the economy.
"Interventions to further reduce the rate of preterm birth among black infants appear the most promising option for reducing black infant mortality and the absolute inequality between black and white infants," the study stated.
Absolute inequality, as measured by the SII, improved from -59.7 (95%CI: -73.0 - -46.4) infant deaths per 1 000 live births in 1990 to -19.6 (95%CI: -27.9 - -11.4) in 2010 in the population gradient defined by access to water, and from -59.8 (95%CI: -73.1 -46.6) infant deaths per 1 000 live births in 1990 to -22.2 (95%CI: -29.5 - -14.8) in 2010 in the population gradient defined by access to sanitation.
In particular, the BRICS suffer from considerable income inequality, with their average Gini coefficient (where zero signifies absolute equality and one is absolute inequality) ranging from 0.37 to 0.50 in 2010-2013.
Using the Gini coefficient as a measure (0 is perfect equality and 1, absolute inequality), the Philippines ranks 0.43 from 0.46 during recent years.
The most recent data from the 2012 cycle of the CCHS indicated that the absolute inequality in type 2 diabetes prevalence, as measured by the SII, was -0.045 [95% confidence interval (CI) = -0.06, -0.029] for women; this suggests that the prevalence of type 2 diabetes was nearly 5 percentage points higher among women with the lowest level of educational attainment compared to those with the highest.
(8) The Gini coefficient measures land ownership inequality on a scale of 0 to 1, with 0 representing absolute equality and 1 representing absolute inequality.
All four outcomes studied including: self/ parent-reported general health; presence of a long-standing illness; obesity; and smoking showed a 'significant' increase in inequality at some point during the strategy, although absolute inequality in smoking among children aged 8-15 increased between 1999 and 2004 before decreasing again by 2009.
The Gini coefficient (a measure of inequality and wealth distribution with o representing absolute equality and 100 representing absolute inequality) fell from 45.7 to 38.9 between 1980 and 2006.