absolute magnitude


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absolute magnitude:

see magnitudemagnitude,
in astronomy, measure of the brightness of a star or other celestial object. The stars cataloged by Ptolemy (2d cent. A.D.), all visible with the unaided eye, were ranked on a brightness scale such that the brightest stars were of 1st magnitude and the dimmest stars
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absolute magnitude

See magnitude.

absolute magnitude

[′ab·sə‚lüt ′mag·nə·tüd]
(astrophysics)
A measure of the brightness of a star equal to the magnitude the star would have at a distance of 10 parsecs from the observer.
The stellar magnitude any meteor would have if placed in the observer's zenith at a height of 100 kilometers.
(mathematics)
The absolute value of a number or quantity.
References in periodicals archive ?
These activities would be particularly appropriate for developing a sense of the relative and absolute magnitude of numbers and for encouraging benchmarking.
Consistent with the magnet hypothesis, the absolute magnitude of [[phi].
We develop separate change measures of absolute magnitude and relative magnitude, which are the difference in the number of Japanese FDIs and the annual growth rate of Japanese FDIs (by industry), respectively.
57 kiloparsecs is used for NGC 6210 then the absolute magnitudes of this object are: -1.
51) Yet neither does the gap left by Leibniz's proof of the impossibility of an absolute magnitude in any positive way sanction his declaration that the indefinite is infinite.
And that's why astronomers measures a star's brightness two ways: by its apparent magnitude (how bright a star looks when seen from Earth) and by its absolute magnitude (how bright a star would look if it were 33 light-years away from Earth).
In the context of our discussion here, this case demonstrates the obvious principle that even though a corporation's presence in a state may be systematic and regular (annual), the absolute magnitude of that presence must be more than slight or de minimis.
The absolute magnitude of the unadjusted differences is also very similar in both instances, although there is more divergence in percentage terms because of the smaller overall average for the second index.
As expected, the absolute magnitude of the pressure of Newtonian fluid is much higher than the power-law fluid with n = 0.
The outer mutation (LCM), applied second, alters the direction, or contour of the intervals mutated first by the inner (IUIM) mutation, which makes some percentage (dependent on the index, [Omega]) of the intervals in the source to be the same absolute magnitude as the corresponding intervals of the target.
The brightness of the star at that distance would then be its absolute magnitude.