absolute scale


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absolute scale

[′ab·sə‚lüt ‚skāl]
(thermodynamics)

Kelvin

A thermometer scale starting at absolute zero (approximately −273°C) and having degrees of the same magnitude as those of the Celsius thermometer. Thus, 0°C = 273 K. Named after first Lord Kelvin (1824–1907). Also called an absolute scale.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Measurement of statistical evidence on an absolute scale following thermodynamic principles." Online at arxiv.org/abs/1206.3543
In the top panel of Table 3, we use an absolute scale to tally failures (observations of banks that failed within a year of the reported capital ratio) and nonfailures (observations of banks that did not fail within a year) for individual capital ratio ranges and cumulatively up to a given cutoff point.
Finally, since relative grading (grading on a curve) is antithetical to cooperation as well as to striving for true excellence, students in the project are graded on an absolute scale.
Thus, Griffin's goal is not to justify a whole set of beliefs, but to discover a restricted set of highly reliable beliefs--"either high relative to other beliefs or high on some absolute scale of security of beliefs" (p.
This may be true, but it doe s not show that preference satisfaction cannot be measurable on an absolute scale. To see this, note that we can define, for each individual, a magnitude, P-height, which is the sum of his parents' heights.
Why do we need to use absolute scale of temperature (Kelvin degrees) when we already have a perfectly logical ordinary temperature scale (in degrees Celsius) that serves us well in our normal daily activities?
1992) showed that these results did not stem from any inherent insensitivity of the fractal index, but reflected basic similarities in the complexity of pathways despite their differences on an absolute scale.