absolute temperature


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Related to absolute temperature: Absolute temperature scale

absolute temperature

[′ab·sə‚lüt ′tem·prə·chür]
(thermodynamics)
The temperature measurable in theory on the thermodynamic temperature scale.
The temperature in Celsius degrees relative to the absolute zero at -273.16°C (the Kelvin scale) or in Fahrenheit degrees relative to the absolute zero at -459.69°F (the Rankine scale).

absolute temperature

absolute temperatureclick for a larger image
The temperature value relative to absolute zero. The absolute zero is the theoretical temperature at which molecular motion vanishes and a body would have no heat energy; the zero point of the Kelvin and Rankine temperature scales. Absolute zero may be interpreted as the temperature at which the volume of a perfect gas vanishes or, more generally, as the temperature of the cold source that would render a Carnot cycle 100% efficient. The value of absolute zero is now estimated to be −273.15°C, −459.67°F, 0 K, and 0°R.
References in periodicals archive ?
The absolute temperature coefficient of the photovoltaic cell efficiency can be determined by linear fitting of the efficiency dependence on the temperature.
in which k is Boltzmann's constant, q is the electron charge, T is the absolute temperature, [I.sub.C] is the collector current, and [I.sub.S] is the transistor's saturation current, which is proportional to the transistor's emitter area.
It was verified that values of ln (D) as a function of the inverse absolute temperature (1/Ta) showed similar behavior for the ranges of temperature 75 to 90[degrees]C and 105 to 120[degrees]C for initial moisture content of 25% (d.b.) (Figure 4B).
For simplicity and consistency, the same temperature records for Churchill and Inukjuak used to calculate AT were used to calculate a new index of absolute temperature that is representative of the whole Bay.
where k is the gain, [epsilon] is the emissivity of the polymer, [T.sub.mclt] and [T.sub.mold] are the absolute temperatures of the melt and the mold, respectively, and n is dependent on the filter and sensor characteristics (equal to 4 for a perfect "black" body and unlimited wavelength range).
The dependency between distribution coefficients [K.sub.i] and the absolute temperature T having shape of [K.sub.i]=f(T) can be represented with an equation used to describe the ideal solutions' extraction equilibrium [3]
When Lewis's model ([M.sub.1], [M.sub.2] and [M.sub.3]) and the three air drying speeds are taken into account, it may be verified that the drying coefficient ([k.sub.1], [k.sub.2] and [k.sub.3]) varied with the variation of absolute temperature (in Kelvin).
If s (heatingrate) is defined as q dT/dt, and k is expressed as k ko exp(-E/RT), Eq.(2) can be defined asequationwhere, T is the absolute temperature, ko is thefrequency factor, R is the universal gas constant andE is the activation energy.
In a perfect crystal at zero absolute temperature, these free electrons can be described by using the quantum mechanical formalism of the Bloch waves [1,2].
"The absolute temperature ends up being roughly the same as what it would have been, but the rate of change is so drastic, that ecosystems and organisms would have very little time to adapt to the changes," lead author Kelly McCusker, who did the work for her UW doctoral thesis, said.
Weather conditions examined in the study were number of days registering temperatures below 0[degrees] C or over 25[degrees]C in that year, total number of clear and cloudy days in the year, total annual rainfall (mm), maximum and minimum absolute temperature in the year, and altitude.
Unlike Fahrenheit and Celsius temperatures, where the zero point is arbitrary, absolute temperature (measured in kelvins) supposedly can go no lower than zero.