absolute temperature

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Related to absolute temperatures: thermodynamic temperature scale

absolute temperature

[′ab·sə‚lüt ′tem·prə·chür]
(thermodynamics)
The temperature measurable in theory on the thermodynamic temperature scale.
The temperature in Celsius degrees relative to the absolute zero at -273.16°C (the Kelvin scale) or in Fahrenheit degrees relative to the absolute zero at -459.69°F (the Rankine scale).

absolute temperature

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The temperature value relative to absolute zero. The absolute zero is the theoretical temperature at which molecular motion vanishes and a body would have no heat energy; the zero point of the Kelvin and Rankine temperature scales. Absolute zero may be interpreted as the temperature at which the volume of a perfect gas vanishes or, more generally, as the temperature of the cold source that would render a Carnot cycle 100% efficient. The value of absolute zero is now estimated to be −273.15°C, −459.67°F, 0 K, and 0°R.
References in periodicals archive ?
Weather conditions examined in the study were number of days registering temperatures below 0[degrees] C or over 25[degrees]C in that year, total number of clear and cloudy days in the year, total annual rainfall (mm), maximum and minimum absolute temperature in the year, and altitude.
that enables one to evaluate the mean time to failure (MTTF) [tau] from the known applied stress [delta] (not necessarily mechanical); the absolute temperature T, the time constant [[tau].sub.0], the (stress-independent) binding (activation) energy [U.sub.0]; k = 1.3807 x [10.sup.-23]J/[.sup.0]K is Boltzmann's constant, and the factor [gamma] is the material (device) constant that is a measure of the vulnerability of the material to the applied stress and is measured by energy per unit stress, so that the product [gamma][delta] measured in energy units.
However, neither the thermocouple nor the microhotplate thermal resistance can be directly calibrated as a temperature sensor by heating the entire chip containing the microhotplate because, unlike the heater resistance which responds to absolute temperature, the thermocouple and the thermal resistance respond to the temperature difference between the microhotplate and the substrate on which it is located.
Beginning with Thomson's attempts to define and then measure absolute temperatures and an outline of the difficulties of operationalism, lead to a proposed modified, two step process, the development of a concrete image from the abstract system, then the matching of that image to concrete entities and operations.