absolute temperature

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Related to absolute temperatures: thermodynamic temperature scale

absolute temperature

[′ab·sə‚lüt ′tem·prə·chür]
(thermodynamics)
The temperature measurable in theory on the thermodynamic temperature scale.
The temperature in Celsius degrees relative to the absolute zero at -273.16°C (the Kelvin scale) or in Fahrenheit degrees relative to the absolute zero at -459.69°F (the Rankine scale).

absolute temperature

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The temperature value relative to absolute zero. The absolute zero is the theoretical temperature at which molecular motion vanishes and a body would have no heat energy; the zero point of the Kelvin and Rankine temperature scales. Absolute zero may be interpreted as the temperature at which the volume of a perfect gas vanishes or, more generally, as the temperature of the cold source that would render a Carnot cycle 100% efficient. The value of absolute zero is now estimated to be −273.15°C, −459.67°F, 0 K, and 0°R.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, neither the thermocouple nor the microhotplate thermal resistance can be directly calibrated as a temperature sensor by heating the entire chip containing the microhotplate because, unlike the heater resistance which responds to absolute temperature, the thermocouple and the thermal resistance respond to the temperature difference between the microhotplate and the substrate on which it is located.
The amount of energy radiated from a hot item, versus that of a cool item, depends on the variation between the fourth powers of their absolute temperatures.
Infrared thermography is invaluable to any PdM program because a radiometric, thermal image shows absolute temperatures across a full, two-dimensional picture, making problem identification faster and more effective than with a spot thermometer or other measuring device.
The temperatures in Eqs 1 are absolute temperatures.