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absolute,

in philosophy, the opposite of relative. The term has acquired numerous widely variant connotations in different philosophical systems. It means unlimited, unconditioned, or free of any relation; perfect, complete, or total; permanent, inherent, or ultimate; independent, or valid without reference to a perceiving subject. In epistemology, absolute means certain or indubitable as opposed to probable or hypothetical. As a substantive, the absolute is the ultimate basis of reality, the principle underlying the universe. Theologically, it is synonymous with, or characteristic of, God. Philosophically, it may be considered as the unknowable, the thing-in-itself; as that ultimate nonrelative that is the basis of all relation; as the ultimate, all-comprehensive principle in which all differences and distinctions are merged. The concept of the absolute was present in Greek philosophy. In modern times, both realists and idealists have used the term, but it is, perhaps, most intimately connected with the idealism of G. W. HegelHegel, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich
, 1770–1831, German philosopher, b. Stuttgart; son of a government clerk. Life and Works

Educated in theology at Tübingen, Hegel was a private tutor at Bern and Frankfurt.
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absolute

[‚ab·sə′lüt]
(meteorology)
Referring to the highest or lowest recorded value of a meteorological element, whether at a single station or over an area, during a given period. Abbreviated abs.

absolute

1. Physics
a. (of a pressure measurement) not relative to atmospheric pressure
b. denoting absolute or thermodynamic temperature
2. Maths
a. (of a constant) never changing in value
b. (of an inequality) unconditional
c. (of a term) not containing a variable
3. Law (of a court order or decree) coming into effect immediately and not liable to be modified; final
4. Law (of a title to property, etc.) not subject to any encumbrance or condition

absolute

In programming, a mathematical function that always returns a positive number. For example, ABS(25-100) yields 75, not -75. See absolute address.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus we have seen that the religiosity of populism can be discerned through locating the two main components of the populist movement, the people and the leader, which are sanctified and assigned the status of absoluteness.
This principle is closely connected to the task-related principle of absoluteness, which will be discussed a little later.
It is in this context that I must ask some probing questions about pluralists' argument: Is it correct to say that the "ailment" identified as Ptolemaic theology, with its symptoms of absoluteness and superiority, comes about from not taking the data of other religions seriously?
In fairness, the absoluteness of a market capitalisation reports not only a specific value associated with the respective brand or organisation, but also on a brand's relative value within an ecosystem and an economic environment.
Against pluralist theologians, the author insists on the uniqueness and absoluteness of Jesus' incarnation; attempts to read that incarnation in a symbolic fashion or as nonunique strike Sonnemans as a potential agnosticism (p.
Secularization, in his opinion, means only the separation of belief and politics, and he says that as a result of Islamic immigration Europeans may once again acquire a stronger belief in the absoluteness of God.
If we are able to show the absoluteness of this contingency, says Meillassoux, then contingency itself becomes 'immunized' against the procedure of correlationism to subsume contingency in-itself under contingency for-us (AF 55/75).
The model can be characterized by its absoluteness properties and certain homogeneity properties.
1) For example, see Ernst Troeltsch, The Absoluteness of Christianity and the History of Religions, introduction by James Luther Adams, trans.
It was the problem of liberation, in prison and in exile, from within the absoluteness of Power.
The brilliance of Wagner's Das Rheingold rests in the absoluteness of its central theme: attainment of ultimate power and wealth requires abandonment of human love.
Schelling responded by proposing a new theory that: "There is no continuous transition from the Absolute to the actual; the origin of the phenomenal world is conceivable only as a complete falling-away from absoluteness by means of a leap.