abstinence syndrome


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abstinence syndrome

[′abz·tə·nəns ′sin·drōm]
(medicine)
A disturbance of metabolic equilibrium that occurs when a narcotic drug is withdrawn from the user.
References in periodicals archive ?
* As with many other medications, fetal dependence may occur with methadone or buprenorphine, resulting in neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) at birth.
Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) surveillance in the United States is based largely on diagnosis codes in hospital discharge data, without validation of these codes or case confirmation.
The medication part of preventing neonatal abstinence syndrome is just one portion of Moss-King's mission.
The diagnosis of neonatal abstinence syndrome and whether an infant was exposed to more than one substance were also included as dichotomous variables.
A new campaign in New Jersey is aimed at reducing the significant rise in babies born with neonatal abstinence syndrome.
The lawsuit states that a baby, identified by his initials T.W.B., was born in March 2017 and diagnosed with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, which can cause breathing and feeding problems.
According to D-H, in 2015, 7.8 percent of infants born to New Hampshire residents at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon were diagnosed with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS), and rates of NAS in New Hampshire hospitals have increased nearly fivefold over the past 10 years.
And the financial cost of curing baby addiction, known medically as neonatal abstinence syndrome, is high.
Patients and caregivers are actively involved in directing research to find the best options for babies with neonatal abstinence syndrome, all patients with substance use disorder and their families.
CHICAGO -- A study that compares babies who develop neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) with a control group of healthy newborns found largely what researchers expected to see--lower gestational ages, lower birth weights, and substance use in 100% of the mothers in the affected group.
(1) The exposure to crack and other psychoactive substances by the pregnant woman significantly increase the rates of neonatal abstinence syndrome diagnosed in the prenatal and newborn.
Opioid use disorder in Indiana resulted in $31.9 million in costs for nonfatal ER visits, $64.1 million for hospitalizations of babies with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, $350 million for related hospitalizations, and $1.4 billion from drug overdose fatalities, which includes medical costs and lost lifetime earnings for victims.