abyssal


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abyssal

[ə′bis·əl]
(geology)
(oceanography)
Pertaining to the abyssal zone.
References in periodicals archive ?
In short, the central aim of sociology of absences is to turn impossible objects (the knowledge and experience of the peoples and cultures of the South undermined by the epistemology of blindness of colonial modernity and its abyssal thinking) into possible ones, and thus turn absences into presences.
Even the abyssal zones in most oceans are expected to do only marginally better, with temperatures predicted to increase 0.5-1 degrees Celsius (1-2 degrees Fahrenheit) by 2100.
Scientists know little about the benthic (deep-sea) species residing in the abyssal plains, but what they're learning shows them to be highly adapted to an extreme environment, where temperatures hover just above freezing and pressures become crushing.
Now that the deep sea mining of polymetallic nodules on the abyssal plain (4000 to 6000 m depth) of the central Eastern Pacific is to begin in the next few years, serious consideration must be given to the possible effects on the abyssal environment.
Were analyzed not only the nature of the earth surface distribution (land-ocean), but also the quantitative indicators (height/earth surface depth) and also qualitative characteristics (Earth crust type, geo and morphostructural features of continents and abyssal depths).
It rises approximately 2,000m from the surrounding abyssal plain, reaching a water depth of 690m at the top of the feature.
'The amount of heat accumulated within the lowest 1.5 kilometres in the abyssal Greenland Sea would warm the atmosphere above Europe by 4[degrees]C.'
For their study, they analysed temperature data from 1950 to 2010 in the abyssal Greenland Sea, which is an ocean area located just to the south of the Arctic Ocean.
Timothy Steele: A Critical Introduction, and The Violent and Abyssal