abyssal hill

abyssal hill

[ə′bis·əl ′hil]
(geology)
A hill 2000 to 3000 feet (600 to 900 meters) high and a few miles wide within the deep ocean.
References in periodicals archive ?
Estimates of C need to include the contribution of abyssal hill topography on scales O(10) km not resolved by current topography products.
For small-scale waves generated over subcritical abyssal hill topography, overturning of the upward-propagating waves (Muller and Buhler 2009) predicts a bottom-intensified dissipation, with a steeper than exponential decay with height and a local dissipation fraction as large as 60%.
Melet, 2015: A threedimensional map of tidal dissipation over abyssal hills. J.
Remarkably delicate abyssal hill lineations appear.
The work suggests that long stretches of thick oceanic crust called abyssal hills, among the most common landforms on the planet, are the result of worldwide climate changes.
Caption: Abyssal hills, which run parallel to the mid-ocean rift (yellow, center) in this seafloor map, formed when lower sea levels led to large magma outpourings at mid-ocean ridges.
For the first time, the orientation and the length of these abyssal hills could be accurately measured.
in terms of sheer surface area, they can't compare to deep-sea ridges called abyssal hills, which cover 60 to 70 percent of Earth's face.
Some theories about abyssal hills suggest that they develop through eruptions along the midocean ridges.
This two-step process explains how abyssal hills form in the Pacific and other spots where the plates spread apart at their quickest rate, according to the scientists.