acaulous

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acaulous

[¦ā′kȯl·əs]
(botany)
Lacking a stem.
Being apparently stemless but having a short underground stem.
References in periodicals archive ?
Four new taxa of acaulescent Syagrus (Arecaceae) from Brazil.
Since individuals of this species usually do not have an aerial stem, we used the number of main veins as the state variable related to size, as often used in acaulescent palms (Galeano et al., 2010).
Las formas de vida consideradas fueron: 1) hierbas acuaticas (incluye plantas de aguas marginales y profundas), 2) hierbas erectas, 3) hierbas postradas (con estolones) y rastreras (sin estolones), 4) plantas en cojin o tapete, 5) graminoides en penacho, 6) graminoides dispersas, 7) graminoides cespitosas, 8) rosetas acaulescentes, y 9) vegetacion no vascular (briofitos, algas y hongos).
Growth forms and habit type.--All five growth forms (large, intermediate, small, acaulescent and liana) were present in each of the four habitats studied (Table 1, Fig 3).
epiphytic and acaulescent), leaf sheaths not forming a pseudobulb (vs.
acaulescent), upper scape bracts slightly exceeding the internodes (vs.
Ammandra decasperma is often acaulescent, but can develop a prostrate stem.
It encompasses many life forms, from large palms in the forest canopy to small acaulescent palms hidden in semi-arid shrubby vegetation.
e.j.gouda@uu.nl term correct application anterior applicable only in strongly zygomorphic flowers, but even there it remains doubtful posterior see anterior pinnate description of compound leaves with leaflets arranged on opposite sides of an elongated axis or of a certain venation pattern bipinnate twice pinnate (leaves), see above tripinnate pinnately compound three times, with pinnate pirmules (leaflets) quadripinnate pinnately compound four times, with nate pinnules (leaflets) scape leafless peduncle arising from ground level (usually from a basal rosette) in acaulescent plants (e.g.
For example, the 'saxophone growth' type (Tomlinson, 1990), which is characterised by a geotropic growth of the trunk in the early stages of development, ensures an effective underground protection of the apical meristem of juvenile palms and acaulescent adults.
Numerous species are massive palms forming dense stands and they are therefore remarkable elements of the landscape, but there are also smaller acaulescent species in both forests and savannas.