accelerated stall

accelerated stall

accelerated stallclick for a larger image
A stall entered during accelerated flight (i.e., during maneuvers). During such maneuvers, when the stalling angle is reached, the aircraft stalls at higher speeds than it would during a normal stall in straight and level flight; the speed is directly proportional to the square root of the applied load factor. For example, an aircraft whose stalling speed during level flight is 150 knots will stall at 300 knots when it is pulled out of a dive with 4 g force. Also known as high-speed stall.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
But now you might point out that flying too slow in turbulence will increase the risk of an accelerated stall. True, but a gust-induced stall usually is very brief and the wing recovers almost before the pilot realizes that it has happened.
The Corsair was much less a handful than the P-51 when flown into an accelerated stall, although it was by no means as forgiving as the F6F Hellcat.
An instructor introducing steep turns, for example, might say, "Now what do you think would happen if I kept pulling back while banked this far?" Voila: the accelerated stall. And a trim stall demonstration helps prove the importance of timely configuration changes during go-arounds.
Failure to take immediate steps toward recovery when an accelerated stall occurs may result in a complete loss of flight control, notably, power-on spins."
The landing-configuration stalling speed (Vso) also increases, predisposing an accelerated stall: Vso at 1 G = 48 KIAS, while Vso at 1.55 G = 60 KIAS.
As the turn tightens, more pitch/power is necessary to maintain altitude, until we start pulling some G and enter an accelerated stall. All of which could be avoided if we imposed three basic limits on our low-level maneuvering.
A common misconception among primary students is that an accelerated stall involves increasing airspeed.
In this V-N Diagram example, 20 mph (17 knots) below published VA results in about the same protection against damage from positive and negative gusts (Reference 5), with the accelerated stall occurring at a lower total G.
Any reduction in stall speed also theoretically requires a commensurate reduction in maneuvering speed, the speed at which an accelerated stall unloads the wing before structural damage occurs.
Because CF is increased with a skidding turn--when compared to a properly coordinated turn--wing loading increases and contributes to increases in stalling speed, which predisposes to an accelerated stall.
With the slip-skid ball far to the right, an accelerated stall occurred while yawing left.

Full browser ?