acceptable quality level


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acceptable quality level

[ak¦sep·tə·bəl ′kwäl·ə·dē ‚lev·əl]
(industrial engineering)
The maximum percentage of defects that has been determined tolerable as a process average for a sampling plan during inspection or test of a product with respect to economic and functional requirements of the item. Abbreviated AQL.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Performance Standards and Acceptable Quality Level (AQL)
The program area representative will likely best know the acceptable quality level appropriate for each requirement in the PWS.
The acceptable quality level (AQL) is the maximum percentage of nonconformance that, for purposes of sampling inspection, can be considered a satisfactory average.
A sampling scheme is employed with an acceptable quality level of 0.4%.
While the ideal acceptable quality level (AQL) is zero defects, compromises based on technological limitations as well as business and financial practices erode this ideal and suggest a more realistic real-world experience.
Because of the short lead time, the extreme high acceptable quality level and availability the evaluation of the required components portfolio is an up-to-date challenge.
In order to evaluate educational systems so that graduates achieve acceptable quality levels in different countries and regions, it is relevant to organize and structure a functional system that recognizes and harmonizes the necessary competencies to meet quality service needs in communities as well as apply principles of social responsibility, ethical and effective management, and emerging fundamentals for quality medical practice locally, regionally and globally.
In many of the cities in the region, bandwidth from fixed fibre to the home (FttH) and Mobile 4G LTE networks will finally enable both interactive video services and streamed content to be delivered at acceptable quality levels.
If that company's "low-priced good exceed the average acceptable quality levels for most people" and if many people are "reserving their devotion and dollars for a basket of truly 'irresistible' brands" and if Toyota isn't simply irresistible, it may find itself having to do things that it has never had to do before vis-a-vis moving its sheet metal.
IPEC has already made a significant contribution to the debate by publishing a GMP guide for excipients, a practical authoritative document that not only helps excipient suppliers meet the increasingly stringent demands of the pharmaceutical industry, but also makes it easier for pharmaceutical companies to ensure their suppliers are meeting acceptable quality levels.

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