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access

[′ak‚ses]
(civil engineering)
Freedom, ability, or the legal right to pass without obstruction from a given point on earth to some other objective, such as the sea or a public highway.
(computer science)
The reading of data from storage or the writing of data into storage.

access

(to post-compulsory education) the process of facilitating entry to formal learning for ‘non-traditional’ students (e.g. CLASS, ETHNIC GROUP, AGE GROUP and disability). Theoretically, entry may be hindered in various ways including economically, culturally and institutionally In practice, however, potential entrants may be confronted by a combination of these obstacles. Access researchers are particularly concerned with resisting and criticizing the application of‘deficit’ models to potential entrants. In attempting to explain instances of under- or non-participation such models sometimes ignore wider socio-economic and cultural factors and will look to the individual, claiming, for example, that ‘low aspirations’ are decisive and can be acted on directly See also ACCESS COURSES.

access

A means of approach, e.g., a road, street, or walk.

Access

(language)
An English-like query language used in the Pick operating system.

Access

(database, product)

access

(1) To store data on and retrieve data from a disk or other peripheral device. See access arm, access method and Microsoft Access.

(2) The entrance to the Internet or other online service or network.

(3) In computer security, the opportunity for use of a resource. See logical access and physical access.
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to control accesses, NAP-Web uses Run_Ready (RR), Wait queue (WA) and Re_Access queue (RA) and Next_Wait table.
Each client issues the designated simultaneous accesses severally to a bulletin board system (ASKA BBS [9]) on origin server.
This is because there are 2 kinds of accesses. One succeeds at the first time access, and the other requires re-access.
This configuration simplifies administration for the development team; because everyone accesses a single, master source code directory, there is only one logical copy of the source code, to manage.
Although data resides on common storage (the SAN), only one system "owns" and accesses the data at any time.
Each node (web server) accesses its own read-only copy of a web site.
Applications continue to run on the local server that accesses the NAS using NDMP (Network Data Management Protocol).

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