Accipiter

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Accipiter

 

a genus of hawks (order Falconiformes). Accipiters are adapted to hunting in the forest. They have short wings with a swept-back tip and a long tail, which accounts for their ability to fly skillfully among trees while pursuing prey. The feet are strong, with long, sharp claws. The birds have a keen sense of hearing.

Accipiters nest in trees. There are two to six eggs, of a single color or spotted, per clutch. The female does most of the brooding. The young stay for a very long time in the nest and are fed by both parents. Accipiters feed largely on small mammals and birds, occasionally eating amphibians, reptiles, and insects. The 52 species are widely distributed, absent only in arctic, antarctic, and forestless desert regions. The USSR has five species: the goshawk, sparrow hawk, A. brevipes, A. virgatus, and the Chinese sparrow hawk (A. nisus).

References in periodicals archive ?
Both species of accipiters appear to be increasingly willing to enter human-dominated landscapes; most likely in response to reduced human-caused mortality there.
Whether or not increased numbers of accipiters at bird feeders are impacting regional populations of songbirds and other species feeding at these sites remains unclear, although evidence from England suggests that this may not be occurring (Newton et al.
The prolific and highly regarded bird artist, Louis Agassiz Fuertes, writing in National Geographic, for example, commented that "The whole genus Accipiter, consisting of the [northern] goshawk, Cooper's hawk, and sharp-shinned hawk, are savage, bloodthirsty, and cold-hearted slaughterers, and are responsible in large measure for the anathema that is then portion of all hawks" (Fuertes 1920).
An assessment of exposure and effects of persistent organic pollutants in an urban Cooper's hawk (Accipiter cooperii) population.
Distribution, density, and productivity of accipiter hawks breeding in Oregon.
Genetic and morphological divergence among Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) populations breeding in north-central and western North America.
Table I.- Pellet analysis of Eurasian sparrowhawk Accipiter nisus: prey items (%) and their biomass (%).
Table II.- Seasonal changes in the prey items (%) of Eurasian sparrowhawk Accipiter nisus.
The diet of besra sparrowhawk (accipiter virgatus) in Yangmingshan area, Northern Taiwan.