accusative


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accusative

(əkyo͞o`zətĭv') [Lat.,=accusing], in grammar of some languages, such as Latin, the casecase,
in language, one of the several possible forms of a given noun, pronoun, or adjective that indicates its grammatical function (see inflection); in inflected languages it is usually indicated by a series of suffixes attached to a stem, as in Latin amicus,
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 typically meaning that the noun refers to the entity directly affected by an action. The term is used for similar, but often not identical, features in the grammar of other languages. Thus in the English sentence "He helped him," him is in the accusative (or, as it is sometimes called, objective) case, he in the nominative.
References in periodicals archive ?
The evidence that I present for the above-cited linearization process is relative to the failure of accusative Case valuation on the object of both English topicalization structures (see (4a)) and of Spanish subordinate structures whose matrix verb does not value accusative (see (4b)).
Possible pathways of development of verbal pairs points of phonological morphological conflict wendan & ge-or 0 gewendan pyncan & [1], [e], [y] pinche/penche; pencan puht(e)/poht(e) laeran & [ae], [e], [a] leorne/lerne/ leornian lame (ge)witan & [i], [i:] ge-or 0 (ge)witan blissian & [i], [e] blisse/blesse bletsian (for)beodan & [-e-], [-i-] for- or 0 biddan forbidde points of syntactic semantic conflict wendan & + accusative or to turn' gewendan + dative pyncan & impersonal' or to think'?
ii can be combined, yielding double accusative constructions:
Morphologically, Pashto monotransitives show nominative- accusative case forms in the present and future tenses, and ergative-absolutive case pattern in the past tense: This paper tries to explain structural Case assignment in such constructions.
The order of the words encourages a search for a more challenging reading, making it at least possible--and perhaps even necessary--that the reader not regard this cui as being an accusative used as a direct object ("whom [quern] your Guido perhaps disdained"), but rather as being an accusative of direction ("perhaps toward the one whom [ad eum quern or ad earn quern] your Guido disdained").
2) In transitive or accusative contexts, non-alternating "se" correlates with an implication of inalienable possession between the subject and the object: in (3a) the head is Juan's, and so are the knee in (3b) and the hands in (3c) (they are parts of Juan's body, which is encoded by an inalienable possession relationship).
For example, in (12), accusative case is placed on the final word of the noun phrase 'all human kind' only:
Perhaps the accusative ladies might suggest what their preferred party would have done other than nationalise the yards - to build what?
If she put a sentence thus: "This performance has given great pleasure to my husband and to me," that makes sense as it is in the accusative.
The aim of this paper is to show that an analysis of the relevant phenomena that keeps the wh-interrogative isomorphism as a constant can give an insight into the mechanisms of an interesting correlation: that between T-to-C movement and accusative case assignment.
The first possibility is the accusative of the first person singular pronoun mi in Etruscan, variously spelled as mini, mine, min, mene, men and, once, mi (the last variant explained as an instance of haplography by Rix, La scrittura, 229).
As opposed to emotion verbs with dative complements, all verbs with accusative complements refer to extremely strong positive and negative emotions such as mrziti (to hate), voljeti (to love), obozavati (to adore), prezirati (to despise), ljutiti se (to be angry), naljutiti se (to get angry), razljutiti se (to get angry), srditi se (to be angry), rasrditi se (to get angry), bjesnjeti (to be mad), razbjesnjeti se (to get mad).