acellular vaccine


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acellular vaccine

[¦ā¦sel·yü·lər ‚vak′sēn]
(immunology)
A vaccine consisting of one or more parts of an infectious agent, rather than the whole cell.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"The use of the whole-cell vaccine after the initial vaccination in the first year of life might be a good idea, but we don't know yet if that would correct the immunological defects of the acellular vaccine. And I doubt if American parents will accept the reactions, even later in life.
These reactions are substantially lower with the new acellular vaccines ("Pertussis vaccination", 1997).
Public health agencies in many developed countries began to recommend the acellular vaccine in the late 1990s.
Acellular vaccines for preventing whooping cough in children.
A study of 2388 children who received the acellular vaccine found fewer reactions than with the whole-cell vaccine.
"The durability of protection with the acellular vaccine is not as good as with the whole-cell vaccine, but the problem with the whole-cell vaccine was that it was quite reactive," causing local reactions and fevers, she said in an interview.
And most important, baboons that received the acellular vaccine readily transmitted B.
Referred to as acellular vaccines, they include only the bacterial proteins needed to stimulate protection against pertussis.
But in the mid-1990s --shortly after the acellular vaccine was introduced in 1991--a gradual resurgence began.
Compared with their peers who had received at least one dose of whole cell vaccine, patients who had received only acellular vaccine had at least a tripling of the risk of acquiring the disease, lead author Maxwell Witt reported at the meeting.
pertussis cases, which began in 2005, and then spiked even higher in 2010, implicated the acellular vaccine as the cause.
I'm not surprised to hear that the CDC studies found pertussis immunity waned after the fifth childhood acellular vaccine dose in some 7- to 10-year-olds.