acetic acid bacteria


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acetic acid bacteria

[ə′sēd·ik ′as·əd ‚bak′tir·ē·ə]
(microbiology)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Spontaneous organic cocoa bean box fermentations in Brazil are characterized by a restricted species diversity of lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria. Food Microbiology, London, v.28, n.7, p.1326-1338, 2011.
In nature, yeast and acetic acid bacteria may originate from several sources: the outer surface of healthy berries (albeit in low numbers), inside healthy berries (various non-Saccharomyces yeasts such as Pichia spp.
They mapped metabolic pathway fluxes of the acetic acid bacteria, feeding them specific isotopes that could easily be tracked.
Minimal to no growth of acetic acid bacteria will occur in bottles without significant oxygen.
In Drosophila, acetic acid bacteria are part of the normal commensal bacterial gut community and can be involved in the regulation of the innate immune system.
The main spoilage caused by acetic acid bacteria is associated with oxidation of the ethanol to acetaldehyde and eventually acetic acid.
The acetic acid bacteria are found in nature where ethanol is being formed as a result of yeast fermentation of sugars and plant carbohydrates.
Withdrawing oxygen slows and then stops growth of the acetic acid bacteria during fermentation.
The results are inconsistent with previous studies on maize silages the first temperature peak is associated with the development of yeasts and aerobic acetic acid bacteria and the second temperature increase is a reflection of mold development (Wilkinson and Davies, 2013).
The microbial profiles of these juices show very low levels of Lactobacillus kunkeei (less than 50 cells/mL), variable but still low levels of other lactobacilli and pediococci (also less than 50 cells/mL), with very high populations of un-typed acetic acid bacteria (more than 2,000 cells/mL).
Although the presence of acetic acid bacteria was not determined in this study, the oxidation of acetic acid by acetic acid bacteria might also occur during the extended phase of aerobic deterioration (Spoelstra et al., 1988).