acetone

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acetone

(ăs`ĭtōn),

dimethyl ketone

(dīmĕth`əl kē`tōn), or

2-propanone

(prō`pənōn), CH3COCH3, colorless, flammable liquid. Acetone melts at −94.8°C; and boils at 56.2°C;. It is the simplest aliphatic ketoneketone
, any of a class of organic compounds that contain the carbonyl group, C=O, and in which the carbonyl group is bonded only to carbon atoms. The general formula for a ketone is RCOR′, where R and R′ are alkyl or aryl groups.
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. Acetone is widely used in industry as a solvent for numerous organic substances and is a component of most paint and varnish removers. It is used in the manufacture of synthetic resins and fillers, smokeless powders (e.g., cordite), and numerous other organic compounds. Acetone is produced commercially chiefly by catalytic dehydrogenation of isopropanol.
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Acetone

A solvent which evaporates quickly; used in paint removers, thinners, and lacquers.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

acetone

[′as·ə‚tōn]
(organic chemistry)
CH3COCH3 A colorless, volatile, extremely flammable liquid, miscible with water; used as a solvent and reagent. Also known as 2-propanone.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

acetone

A highly flammable solvent which evaporates rapidly; used in lacquers, paint removers, thinners, etc.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

acetone

a colourless volatile flammable pungent liquid, miscible with water, used in the manufacture of chemicals and as a solvent and thinner for paints, varnishes, and lacquers. Formula: CH3COCH3
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005