achalasia


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achalasia

[‚ak·ə′lāzh·ē·ə]
(medicine)
Inability of a hollow muscular organ or ring of muscle (sphincter) to relax.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Apparent complete lower esophageal sphincter relaxation in achalasia. Gastroenterology 1986;90:978-83.
At the same time, we must keep in our mind other pathologies entities with similar symptoms: GERD, achalasia, Crohn's disease, connective tissue disorders, hypereosinophilic syndrome, pill esophagitis and infectious esophagitis.
Achalasia is a motor disorder characterized by a decrease or absent esophageal body peristalsis and inability to sufficiently relax the lower esophageal sphincter (LES).
"The commonest symptom of achalasia is difficulty in swallowing, and patients get a sensation that swallowed food, as well as liquids, gets stuck in the chest."
"The patient was relived through Laparoscopic Heller-Dor operation, an effective and safe surgical procedure in resolving symptoms of achalasia and is today the first choice in treating the disease", added Dr.
The medication has been shown in non-clinical studies to modulate the nitric oxide/soluble guanylate cyclase/cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling pathway, which is believed to be implicated in achalasia and sickle cell disease.
Among their topics are fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease, endoscopic therapy for Barrett's esophagus: who and how, whether there is a role for endoscopic therapy in achalasia, the minimally invasive management of benign esophageal tumors and cysts, and the contemporary management of iatrogenic and non-iatrogenic esophageal injuries.
In this technique, one submucosal tunnel is created to provide a working space for endoscopic interventions, including resection of gastrointestinal neoplastic lesions [3, 18-21] and submucosal tumors [22, 23], myotomy for achalasia [24] and gastroparesis [25], and even to permit safer access to the peritoneal and thoracic cavity for related diagnosis and treatment [26, 27].
tuberculosis, fungal infection, human immunodeficiency virus, cytomegalovirus) (viii) Triple A syndrome or Allgrove syndrome (alacrimia, achalasia, adrenal insufficiency) (ix) Adrenal unresponsiveness to ACTH due to gene mutations (x) Familial glucocorticoid deficiency (xi) Drug effects (mitotane, ketoconazole, aminoglutethimide, metyrapone, megestrol, rifampin) SECONDARY (CENTRAL) (i) Congenital (a) Septo-optic dysplasia (b) Pituitary aplasia/hypoplasia (c) Agenesis of corticotrophs (d) POMC (ii) Acquired (a) Trauma (b) Brain tumor (craniopharyngioma) (c) Lymphocytic hypophysitis (d) Surgery (e) Cranial irradiation (f) Infiltrative disease (hemochromatosis, sarcoidosis, Langerhans cell histiocytosis) (g) Steroid withdrawal after prolonged administration
Prematilake et al., "A novel TRAPPC11 mutation in two turkish families associated with cerebral atrophy, global retardation, scoliosis, achalasia and alacrima," Journal of Medical Genetics, vol.
Such calyceal achalasia results in chronic inefficient emptying, leading to progressive dilation proximal to the sphincter and subsequent formation of a diverticulum [3].
Triple A (Allgrove) syndrome, an autosomal recessive disease is characterized by achalasia, alacrimia and ACTH-resistant adrenal failure with progressive neurological syndrome including central, peripheral and autonomic nervous system impairment, and mild mental retardation.