acid hydrolase


Also found in: Medical, Wikipedia.

acid hydrolase

[‚as·əd ′hī·drə‚lās]
(biochemistry)
Any of a group lysosomal digestive enzymes that function optimally in an acidic environment and can sever (by hydrolysis) particular chemical bonds found in natural materials.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Other researchers used inhibitors of the enzyme fatty acid hydrolase so as to increase brain anandamide level, and reported an anticonvulsant effect against seizures evoked by PTZ (29) or cocaine (30).
Analyses of rumen and intestinal methanogens and their genomes have revealed some features, for example, sialic acid synthesis and bile acid hydrolases, which are associated with gut and/or rumen methanogens.
At higher concentrations, these ions rupture lysosomes and release destructive acid hydrolases (Dalston et al., 1986).
It was found that lysosomes membrane rupture and release of acid hydrolases contribute to apoptosis and necrosis of proximal tubular cells, this was identified in pathological situations (Servais et al., 2005).