acid lead

acid lead

[′as·əd ′led]
(metallurgy)
A 99.9% pure commercial lead made by adding copper to fully refined lead.

acid lead

Fully refined lead to which a small amount of copper has been added; 99.9% pure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Abnormal levels of lactic acid lead to inflammation of the joints' cartilage, which begins the cycle of OA symptoms, leading to further inability to exercise.
Pierce, "High levels of palmitic acid lead to insulin resistance due to changes in the level of phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and insulin receptor-1," Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, vol.
Cullo: OK International released a report in June indicating that in 2010 more than half a billion pounds of spent acid lead batteries were shipped from the United States to substandard recycling facilities in Mexico.
For instance, chemical reactions between nicotine and nitrous acid lead to the formation of additional tobacco-specific nitrosamines, and ozone can react with certain volatile otganic compounds to form formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and benzaldehyde.
The combined presence of melamine and cyanuric acid lead to the formation of melamine cyanurate.
Comonomer sequences such as methacrylic acid or anhydride, as well as acrylic acid lead to the increased thermal stability of copolymers (1-4).
The wide range of practical applications of the N-Acetyl D-Neuraminic acid leads to the increasing demand for N-Acetyl D-Neuraminic acid from consumers over the forecast period.
In the year 2012, Mijnhout, et al, conducted a metaanalysis of randomized controlled trials and found that when given intravenously at a dosage of 600 mg/day over a period of 3 weeks, alpha lipoic acid leads to a significant and clinically relevant reduction in neuropathic pain (grade of recommendation A).
An excessive level of uric acid leads to some diseases such as hyperuricemia, gout, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome and kidney disorders (Luo et al., 2006).