acknowledge

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acknowledge

In air traffic control phraseology, it means, “Let me know that you have received and understood the message.”
References in periodicals archive ?
Last month, the philanthropist acknowledged Pakistan's use of innovative systems for immunisation coverage, terming it an example for the rest of the world to emulate.
Newly-appointed F5 Networks CEO Francois Locoh-Donou has acknowledged the need for the company to shift its focus towards software products, and away from being a pure-play application delivery controller provider.
The letter had not been served correctly, so the argument was whether the faxes were valid service (which were not a valid method of service unless acknowledged).
For example, Arbour and Blackburn promote an agenda of 'gay' friendly schools when they accept as gospel that "verbal taunts and abuse of these 'gay and lesbian kids' have led to a suicide rate higher among them than for their peers." This is contradicted by an extensive December 2003 study published by the British Journal of Psychiatry which acknowledged high levels of bullying and harassment in schools, but it noted that it was reported no more often by students with SSA than other students.
By stopping what you are doing and looking at the other person you have acknowledged that his/her feelings and concerns are valid.
To date, the Bush administration remains the only government to have publicly acknowledged that genocide is taking place in Darfur, but it has failed to take the necessary actions to stop this crime against humanity.
Solomon acknowledged that the Treasury Department remains opposed to the codification of the economic substance doctrine.
In its first paragraph, the Times acknowledged the "lawlessness" of the Bush Administration.
In 2002, a network of 17 Anglican legal advisers (now formally constituted as the Anglican Communion Legal Advisers' Network, see sidebar on this page) met in Canterbury to study a draft document stating that "communion with Canterbury is a necessary part of the self-understanding of each member church of the Anglican Communion" and that it was one principle of canon law "common to the communion." The group had met after primates acknowledged that "the unwritten law common to the churches of the Anglican Communion may be understood to constitute a fifth instrument of unity in the communion" and had requested that a "statement of principles" regarding canon law be identified.